Cashew Kernel Price Today

Cashew Kernel Price Today...

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Thứ Sáu, 26 tháng 4, 2013

Workers Attendance Decreases as Colorful Wedding Season Restarts in India

Friday, April 26th, 2013


Shops are now filled with extra customers in India as two months of inactive period is over in the Hindu calender. But cashew factories look completely dull due to workers’ attendance problem. According to some trade sources, even 50% production may not be possible in the next 6-8 weeks.
Usually nothing harm happens, when the Hindu calendar prevents auspicious celebrations by just one or two weeks. But this time, the unofficial prohibition lasted for two months. So this restart is more colorful and more brilliant.
In Goa, processors may fix above Rs6000/Tin/11.340/May-June.
Source: World Cashew

Olympics vs Indian General Elections (2)

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013


Not only the host city but all nations make their best preparations for the Olympics games. Heavy spending on players, trainees, coaches, officials, artists, supporters, tourism and media usually increases global demand for cashew kernel.
The spending in the Indian general elections will only benefit the Indian consumption. But as India is world’s largest consumer of cashew kernel, any extra increase in the Indian consumption will decrease Indian exports and the global supply.
Source: World Cashew

Olympics vs Indian General Elections (1)


Tuesday, April 23rd, 2013
Karnataka state will go for elections on 5 May, 2013. There will be many state elections in India in this fiscal year 2013-14. Indian elections are known for festive look, full activities and heavy spending.
This Diwali may witness acute shortage of cashew kernel as some big states will go for polls during the Diwali consumption period!
However, the biggest boost may come from the nation-wide general elections. For the Indian cashew industry, what has happened during the Olympics may repeat again.
The February-March period is usually the worst period for cashew consumption. But this time, these months may become the canvassing months for the Indian Parliamentary Elections.
Source: World Cashew

Tanzania riots over cashew nut payments


April 24, 2013

About 20 houses have been burnt down in riots by cashew nut farmers and other protesters in southern Tanzania, the local MP has told the BBC.Faith Mitambo said two buildings at her home in Liwale town had been set alight and that other houses targeted belonged to members of the ruling CCM party.

The trouble began after payouts being made to farmers for their crop were less than the price agreed last year.More police have been deployed to the region to stop further unrest.Ms Mitambo, who was in the capital, Dodoma, at the time, told the BBC Swahili service she was travelling down to her constituency to assess the situation.She had been told the protests, involving groups of young men, began in villages on Tuesday morning and reached Liwale town by the evening.

A resident of Liwale told the BBC that on Wednesday there was a sense of fear in the town and police had fired tear gas in the market to stop crowds gathering.He said a police helicopter was flying over the town, which is about 500km (310 miles) south of the main city of Dar es Salaam.Thousands of small-scale cashew nut farmers in Tanzania - who usually begin to harvest in October - sell their crops to co-operative societies at an agreed price.

The BBC's Erick Nampesya in Dar es Salaam says this was set at 1,200 Tanzanian shillings ($0.74; £.048) per kg.Towards the end of last year, the farmers received the first instalment of the money they were owed.But when representatives from the co-operative societies went to the Liwale district on Tuesday to pay out the second and final instalment, the terms had changed.The farmers were offered half or less than half of the outstanding money as they were told that the prices had fallen on world markets.Ruling politicians, who the farmers blame for not helping them, became the target of their anger, our reporter says.Farmers have long complained about the instability of the prices paid for their cashew nut crops - as it fluctuates from season to season, he says.Police spokesperson Advera Senso told the BBC a special team had been sent to Liwale from Dar es Salaam to investigate and assist with making arrests.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/

Cashew workers at Palasa get wage hike, units resume operations


Wed Apr 24 2013

Cashew units at Palasa here resumed operations from Wednesday after the owners reached a settlement with the workers on wage hike.

The negotiations between the operators and workers had started on April 1. The operators have agreed to hike the wages by 32 per cent for women employees and 20 per cent for men, said Malla Srinivasa Rao, President, Palasa Cashew Manufacturers Association.

Each worker, at present, gets ` 150-200 per day and this has been now hiked to ` 200-260 per day. The workers were demanding a hike of 75 per cent .

There are about 200 processing units at Palasa and Kasibugga in Srikakulam district employing about 10,000 workers. Of this, 95 per cent comprises women. "Last year, we purchased cashew nuts from local farmers at `85 per kg and now these are available at ` 60-70 per kg. Though imported nuts are priced at ` 60 per kg, local production is more," he said.

SourceBusiness-Standard.

Ivory Coast to Guarantee Cashew Floor Price, Boost Processing



By Olivier Monnier - Apr 19, 2013 12:26 AM GMT+0700

Ivory Coast, the biggest producer of cashew nuts in Africa, will guarantee farmers get a minimum price for their produce as the country seeks to increase their earnings and expand domestic processing of the crop.


Growers will get at least 60 percent of the world price in the 2014 season, said Vassiriki Konate, head of the national producers’ association. While Ivory Coast already offers a floor price, this season set at 200 CFA francs (40 cents) a kilogram, farmers have received lower rates of 100 to 175 francs, he said.
Slowing world economies led to rising inventories in India and Vietnam, where most of Ivory Coast’s harvest is processed, the agriculture ministry said in a statement. Farmers got 125 to 150 francs last year, while the minimum price was 310 francs.
Some farmers, as in the past, may stockpile their crops in the hope that prices will increase, Konate said.
While output rose 20 percent last year to 450,000 metric tons, less than 5 percent was processed locally, the ministry said. The West African nation aims to process 50 percent of its production by 2015 and all of it by 2020, the ministry added.
The government will also set up a regulator and improve the structure of the industry to increase the quality of production and encourage investment in processing, the ministry said.
To contact the reporter on this story: Olivier Monnier in Abidjan at omonnier@bloomberg.net
To contact the editor responsible for this story: Emily Bowers at ebowers1@bloomberg.net
Source: Bloomberg

Thứ Sáu, 19 tháng 4, 2013

EU, US cashew import decline harms India

Date: 4/17/2013

In the 11 months to end of February, India's cashew kernel exports stood at 93,029 tonnes, a fall of 23.5 per cent compared to same time last year.

Overall exports in 2012-13 could be 18-20 per cent lower than in 2011-12, when India exported 1,31,760 tonnes of cashew kernels, valued at Rs 4,391 crore (this was 24.6 per cent higher than in 2010-11).

Official data for 2012-13 is being compiled by the Cashew Export Promotion Council of India.

"The fall in consumption across the European Union and the US, key markets for Indian cashew, and consolidation of Vietnam in the global cashew trade have hit India's exports. Also, India's kernel prices are higher compared to Vietnam, owing to higher production costs in India," Pankaj Sampath of Mumbai-based Samsons Traders told Business Standard.

Vietnam has been pushing its kernels at prices lower than India's. The cost of processing in India was 20-30 per cent higher compared to that in Vietnam, as the Indian processing industry largely depended on imported raw nuts, Sampath said. India imports about half its raw cashew requirement. Between April 2012 and February 2013, India imported 8,52,674 tonnes of raw cashew nuts; domestic production during this period was estimated at 5,00,000 tonnes, Sampath said.

In dollar terms, exports in April-February 2012-13 were worth $668 million, against $841 million the season before, a decline of 20.5 per cent.

Source: business-standard.com 


Cashew edges up on domestic buying


KOCHI, APRIL 17: 

The global cashew market was quiet and soft last week after being steady for several weeks.
The domestic market, which was subdued for several weeks, saw some activity with a slight increase in prices.

During the last one month, there has not been much change in the price range viz., W240 from $3.90-4.10 / W320 $3.35-3.50 / W450 and SW320 $3.05-3.20, splits $2.20-2.30 and pieces $1.50-1.60 an lb (fob).

During this period, a reasonable volume has been traded for second quarter shipments, not much has been traded for the second half, Pankaj N. Sampat, a Mumbai-based dealer toldBusiness Line.

“In the next 8-10 weeks, we will continue to get confusing reports on the supply side,” he claimed. Picture will be clearer by end-June.

But, overall feeling is that availability in 2013 would be same as 2012; downside on prices is limited and any price decline will be more on account of lower yield rather than increased availability, he said.

Demand prospects continue to be hazy.

DEMAND PROSPECTS

Gut feeling is that demand in most markets should be better considering prices have been steady at relatively low levels for a reasonably long time.

Except for 2011 when prices were very high, usage in Asia has always been good.

Over the last few months, “we have seen that when prices have been moving sideways in the $3.30-3.50 range. When prices are in lower half of the range, there is good buying interest from all markets but selling is limited to nearbys and at that time some business is done for forwards at the higher end of the range.”

When nearby prices are at higher end of the range, buyers are reluctant to pay additional premium for forward positions and this makes the market quiet again.

Unless something dramatic happens on the supply side leading to higher raw cashew prices, “we expect that market will continue to move in the current range,” the trade said.

Source: Business Line

Steady international cashew market


APRIL 16, 2013

The international cashew market has been steady for several weeks – the undertone was reasonably firm in weeks 13 & 14 but was quiet on the softer side in week 15. Indiandomestic market which was very quiet for several weeks saw some activity in week 15 with a slight increase in prices. 

During the last month, there has not been much change in price range – W240 from USD 3.90 to 4.10 / W320 from USD 3.35 to 3.50 / W450 & SW320 from USD 3.05 to 3.20,  Splits from USD 2.20 to 2.30 and Pieces from USD 1.50 to 1.60 FOB. During this period, a reasonable volume has been traded for second quarter shipments, not much has been traded for thesecond half.

RCN prices have also been moving within a range. Good volume has been traded to Vietnambut movements from West Africa are slow. Lack of warehouse space in Abidjan is creating additional problems. There have been good efforts to educate farmers and traders about the need (and advantages) of proper handling of RCN between collection and shipment. But, the early rains in many areas are causing concern about the quality. 

Higher price differentials for lower grades (higher availability due to mechanisation and poor RCN quality) effects drag on shellers cash flow, reduction in realisation per mt of RCN. Anothereffect is lower availability of white wholes even when there is no reduction in availability of RCN. This is changing the traditional parity calculations.  Industry has to work on all angles to remedy this situation – better RCN quality, improvements in processing, new uses for lower grades. 

In the next 8-10 weeks reports on the supply may be confusing but the picture will be clearer by the end June.  But, overall feeling is that (a) availability in 2013 will be the same as 2012 (b) downside on prices limited (c) any price decline will be more or account of lower yield rather than increased availability. 
Demand prospects continue to be hazy. Gut feeling is that demand in most markets should be better considering prices have been steady at relatively low levels for a reasonably long time. Except for 2011 when prices were very very high, usage in Asia has always been good. 
Over the last few months, we have seen that when prices have been moving sideways in the 3.30-3.50 range. When prices are in the lower half of the range, there is good buying interestfrom all markets but selling is limited to nearbys (at that time some business is done for forwards at the higher end of the range). When nearby prices are at higher end of the range, buyers are reluctant to pay additional premium for forward positions and this makes the market quiet again. Unless something dramatic happens on the supply side leading to higher RCN prices, we expect that market will continue to move in the current range. 

To sum up, we continue to believe that market will remain steady to firm during 2013 with some possibility of a limited dip in Apr/May if RCN prices come down and a strong possibility of higher levels in the second half of the year, especially if the RCN prices do not come down.

Source: Cashew India

India: Cashew kernel exports may see 18-20% fall


APRIL 16, 2013

In the 11 months ended February, India's cashew kernel exports stood at 93,029 tonnes, a fall of 23.5 per cent compared to the year-ago period. According to estimates, exports in March could stand at 12,000-15,000 tonnes. Overall exports in 2012-13 could be 18-20 per cent lower than in 2011-12, when India exported 1,31,760 tonnes of cashew kernels, valued at Rs 4,391 crore (this was 24.6 per cent higher than in 2010-11).




Official data for 2012-13 is being compiled by the Cashew Export Promotion Council of India. 

"The fall in consumption across the European Union and the US, key markets for Indian cashew, and consolidation of Vietnam in the global cashew trade have hit India's exports. Also, India's kernel prices are higher compared to Vietnam, owing to higher production costs in India," Pankaj Sampath of Mumbai-based Samsons Traders told Business Standard. 

Vietnam has been pushing its kernels at prices lower than India's. The cost of processing in India was 20-30 per cent higher compared to that in Vietnam, as the Indian processing industry largely depended on imported raw nuts, Sampath said. India imports about half its raw cashew requirement. Between April 2012 and February 2013, India imported 8,52,674 tonnes of raw cashew nuts; domestic production during this period was estimated at 5,00,000 tonnes, Sampath said. 
Vietnam exports about 1,80,000 tonnes of cashew kernels. Its share in the global export market has risen from 40 per cent about five years ago to 65 per cent. During the same period, India lost its first position in exports. 

With consumption of 1,80,000 tonnes, India is the world's largest consumer of cashew nuts. In value terms, India's exports in the first 11 months of 2012-13 stood at Rs 3,636 crore, a fall of 9.5 per cent compared to Rs 4,017 crore in the year-ago period. Average unit value realisation fell 18.5 per cent to Rs 391 a kg, against Rs 330 a kg in the year-ago period. 

In dollar terms, exports in April-February 2012-13 were worth $668 million, against $841 million in the year-ago period, a decline of 20.5 per cent. 

In 2012-13, net realisation from whole kernels declined. Prices of broken grades also fell, due to a steep rise in the production of broken grades. Sampath said in recent months, the difference in the prices of broken grades and whole kernels had fallen to $0.5. 

Source: Cashew india


Slowdown in the Indian Raw Cashew Harvest


April 18th, 2013


Although the Indian crop-size is much better this year, the peak season is almost over in the western states of Karnataka and Kerala!
In Karnataka, the season may end by April-end.
However, there is no such slowdown in Maharashtra and Goa.
Source: World Cashew

Slide in Raw Cashew Halts Kernel Upswing

April 16th, 2013 


Despite all-round rise in the global consumption, cashew  Kernel has stopped its uptrend in the Indian domestic market. Steep fall in raw cashew may be the main reason. Kernel buyers’ think that the local crop is much better this year, compared to past few years.
Weather may ruin the last crop harvest in Vietnam, and the mid- crop yield  in Ivory Cost and surrounding regions. ‘More buyers but less sellers’ – seems to be the  worldwide kernel situation.
Source: World Cashew

Thứ Ba, 16 tháng 4, 2013

Government likely to host Coconut and Cashew fest in Goa


Tuesday, 16 April 2013


Goa which is famous for Sunburn and seafood festival is likely to add new festivals to state festival list as the state government is examining the possibilities of organizing the coconut or cashew festival during 2013-2014 to boost tourism in the state.
 
Tourism minister Dilip Parulekar in a written reply to assembly has said that the details are to be finalized with regards to the budget for the festival.
 
"Department will examine various possibilities for promoting cashew or coconut based drinks especially among tourists visiting the state," he added
 
Parulekar also said that the department has no intention to replace the existing wine festival by introducing new Feni (local alcoholic drink) festival.
 
Every year million of tourists visit Goa and attend various festivals which are held across the state.

Source: TOI

Thứ Hai, 15 tháng 4, 2013

SAMSON'S CASHEW MARKET REPORT - APR 13, 2013


APR 13, 2013

FOB prices in Week 15 :

W240          US$ 3.95 to 4.05
W320          US$ 3.40 to 3.50
W450          US$ 3.10 to 3.20
SW320        US$ 3.10 to 3.20
SW360        US$ 2.90 to 3.00
SSW            US$ 2.45 to 2.55
Splits          US$ 2.20 to 2.30
Large Pieces US$ 1.50 to 1.60

International Cashew market has been steady for several weeks – undertone was reasonably  firm in Weeks 13 & 14 but was quiet on the softer side in week 15.  Indian domestic market which was very quiet for several weeks saw some activity in Week 15 with a slight increase in prices.

During the last one month, there has not been much change in price range – W24 from 3.90 to 4.10 / W320 from 3.35 to 3.50 / W450 & SW320 from 3.05 to 3.20,  Splits from 2.20 to 2.30 and Pieces from 1.50 to 1.60 FOB. During this period,  a reasonable volume has been traded for second quarter shipments, not much has been traded for the second half.

RCN prices have also been moving within a range. Good volume has been traded to Vietnam but movements from West Africa are slow. Lack of warehouse space in Abidjan is creating additional problems.  There have been good efforts to educate farmers and traders about the need (and advantages) of proper handling of RCN between collection and shipment.  But, the early rains in many areas are causing concern about the quality.

In previous reports, we have talked about the cause of higher price differential for lower grades (higher availability due to mechanisation and poor RCN quality) and its effects (drag on shellers cash flow, reduction in realisatiion per mt of RCN).  Another effect is lower availability of white wholes even when there is no reduction in availability of RCN. This is changing the traditional parity calculations.  Industry has to work on all angles to remedy this situation – better RCN quality, improvements in processing, new uses for lower grades.

In the next 8-10 weeks, we will continue to get confusing reports on the supply side. Picture will be clearer by end June.  BUT, overall feeling is that (a) availability in 2013 would be same as 2012 (b) downside on prices is limited (c) any price decline will be more or account of lower yield rather than increased availability.

Demand prospects continue to be hazy. Gut feeling is that demand in most markets should be better considering prices have been steady at relatively low levels for a reasonably long time. Except for 2011 when prices were very very high, usage in Asia has always been good.

Over the last few months, we have seen that when prices have been moving sideways in the 3.30-3.50 range.  When prices are in lower half of the range, there is good buying interest from all markets but selling is limited to nearbys (at that time some business is done for forwards at the higher end of the range).  When nearby prices are at higher end of the range, buyers are reluctant to pay additional premium for forward positions and this makes the market quiet again.  Unless something dramatic happens on the supply side leading to higher RCN prices, we expect that market will continue to move in the current range.

To sum up, we continue to believe that market will remain steady to firm during 2013 with some possibility of a limited dip in Apr/May if RCN prices come down and a strong possibility of higher levels in the second half of the year, especially if the RCN prices do not come down.

Pankaj N. Sampat | SAMSONS TRADERS

Thứ Bảy, 13 tháng 4, 2013

Cashew production hits 20,000 tonnes


THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013


The National Cashew Association of Nigeria (NCAN) has said the yearly production of cashew in the country has hit 120,000 tonnes.
The group also reiterated the need to properly fund the cashew industry to ensure value addition and increased exportation.
In a statement signed by the National Secretary of the association, Mr Sotonye Anga, it said: “Cashew in Nigeria provides livelihood for over 300,000 families in the country, with annual production put at 120,000 tonnes.
“Unlocking financing to the cashew sector means creating more jobs for our people, reducing poverty and ensuring increased exports of cashew and will encourage value addition to raw cashew.
“NCAN cashew financing forum is leveraging on the Nigerian cashew cluster finance scheme which was signed during the 2012 annual National cashew season flag off in Ilorin, Kwara State.”
Anga, who is also the Chairman of the Local Organising Committee (LOC) of the event, noted that more funds were required to grow the sector.
He stressed that cashew traders, exporters, farmers, processors and others across the value chain, needed access to financing to be able to grow their businesses.
“With this, traders, exporters, farmers, cashew processors and other stakeholders across the value chain will be able to access financing at a pocket friendly rate to improve their cashew businesses,” he said.
Source: thenationonlineng.net

Mozambican government approves plan to increase cashew production

THURSDAY, APRIL 4, 2013

Cashew production in Mozambique is expected to increase from 112,000 tons to 182,000 tons in 10 years by implementing programmes focused on research, new plantations and spraying, the deputy Agriculture Minister said in Maputo Tuesday.
At the end of a Council of Ministers meeting that approved the 2nd Cashew Master Plan, which will be in place from 2013 to 2023, deputy minister António Limbau said that the document outlined strategies and activities designed to ensure the development of the sector and the wellbeing of the population involved in cashew production.
Cited by daily newspaper Notícias, Limbau said that the first master plan had led to development of four varieties of cashews in order to increase production, as well as leading to increased domestic processing of cashews, which currently stands at 30,000 tons, the highest amount of all African cashew producing countries.
The 2nd Cashew Master Plan points to increasing sapling production from 2.7 million plants currently to 4.6 million in the next ten years and increasing the number of cashew trees that are sprayed from 4.8 million to 5 million to increase yield, which is expected to increase from 5 kilos to 12 kilos.
The plan is also intended to improve the quality of the nuts, which is important for both domestic processing and export, and to increase domestic processing capacity to 100,000 tons per year.
In the 1970s Mozambique was the world’s largest cashew producer, with production of over 200,000 tons, which fell due to a number of factors, one of which was Mozambique’s 16-year civil war. (macauhub)

Source: Macau Hub

Kerala Govt Should Step in to Help Cashew Farmers


Fri Apr 12 2013

The raw cashew quality has improved in Kerala but there is still climatic uncertainty in Vietnam, Ivory Coast and Ghana. Even then, the Kerala raw cashew is on a big collapse and there is no support from anywhere! The impact of this collapse can be seen in the entire Indian raw cashew market.

Therefore, the state owned factories in Kerala should immediately come forward to start their bulk procurement activity. Farmers should also know their responsibility. If they fail in drying their farm collections even when the rain comes, the burden will fall on the Government.

So the Govt should only support the sun-dried raw cashews by fixing a maximum moisture content.

Source: worldcashew.com

India losing cashew ground to Vietnam


Fri Apr 12 2013

Cashew nut production in India has more than doubled over the last twenty years. Despite this, however, poor yield in comparison with competitors, such as Vietnam, is still a concern for the industry. According to official estimates, raw cashew output in 2012-13 is about 7.3 lakh tonnes (lt) from an area of over 9.8 lakh hectares. This is against 3.48 lt from 5.65 lakh hectares in 1993-94 and 5 lt from 7.7 lakh hectares in 2002-03.

Concerted efforts by the Directorate of Cashew and Cocoa Development coupled with that of National and State Horticulture Missions have resulted in the growth. Vietnam has improved its production in recent years, taking top spot in cashew production from India. Total raw cashew production in Vietnam in 1993 was 1.86 lt from 69,100 hectares. It shot up to 12.73 lt from a total area of 3.31 lakh hectares in 2011, according to the latest FAO statistics.

The yield from a hectare is currently 3.8 tonnes in Vietnam against India's 772 kg. Industry experts say India's productivity issues are related to use of ild plantations for cultivation.

De Abdul Salam, Vice Chancellor of Calicut University, who has made significant contributions to crop development, says that plantations require replanting with newer, higher yielding varieties. India has 24% of the world's cashew production area and yet only manages to grow 19% of the total global yield, whilst Vietnam, with 10% of area under cultivation produces much more in terms of volume.

Source: thehindubsuinessline.com

VN imports raw cashew en mass


Fri Apr 12 2013

Vietnamese cashew processors have increasingly imported raw cashew from Africa en mass over the last few years, despite their poor quality. Raw cashew imports from the African countries are considered ‘cashew waste’ as they are always of poor quality and mixed with contaminants. Local cashew processors, however, imported nearly 60,000 tons of raw cashews in the first two months of this year, and the full-year figure is expected to be some 400,000 tons. The contaminants usually found the raw cashew shipments from the Africa include cashew skins, rotten branches, and cashew sprouts, according to the director of a cashew processing company in the southern province of Dong Nai.

“The imports look like a pile of garbage,” he said.
“Without a timely restriction on African raw cashew imports, the country will continue to discard the rubbish for Africa,” he warned. Meanwhile, Nguyen Duc Thanh, director of Tanimexco, said he has recently incurred a VND4 billion loss as his 1,500 ton raw cashew imports from an African partner were found with poor quality. It is however not simple to stop sourcing raw cashew from the Africa, insiders admit. Vietnam is currently capable of processing more than 800,000 tons of cashews a year, while the local suppliers can account for less than a half of the capacity.

“Vietnamese cashews are of higher quality but businesses still have to import as supply falls short of demand,” said Pham Van Cong, deputy chairman of the Vietnam Cashew Association (Vinacas). Another crucial reason is that local raw cashews fetch much higher than their imported counterparts, Thanh of Tanimexco said. With the sourcing price of VND29,000 a kg for local raw cashews, a processor will incur a $330 loss per every ton of exported product, Thanh said. “Meanwhile, if using imported raw material, the processor will enjoy a $180 a ton profit,” he added.

Many African nations do have high quality raw cashews, but these good materials are exported to India, and the waste products are heading to Vietnam, an expert with knowledge on the matter said. With such raw materials, the quality of the Vietnamese exported processed cashew products has also been on decline, he added. In a longer term, this will also affect the top position of Vietnam in the world’s processed cashew exporting market, warned Vinacas former chairman Ho Ngoc Cam. Some African countries are switching from a raw material exporting nations to processing cashew on their home soil, and thus may become competitors to Vietnam in the near future, he added. Local cashew growers, meanwhile, are chopping down the trees to switch to other plants which they said will yield higher profits.

Source: http://tuoitrenews.vn

Cashew prices rise on fresh buying


Thu Apr 11 2013

Cashew prices rose by ` 5 per kg in the national capital today, largely on the back of fresh buying by retailers and stockists due to 'Navratras' demand. Tight supplies from growing regions also supported the upside in prices.

Cashew kernel No 180, No 210, No 240 and No 320 rose by ` 5 each to conclude at at ` 710-750, ` 670-695, `590-610 and ` 510-560 per kg, respectively. Marketmen said increased buying by retailers and stockists to meet 'Navratras' festival demand, mainly pushed up pistachio prices in the wholesale dry fruit market here.

The following are today's quotations (per 40 kg): Almond (California) ` 13,000 Almond (Gurbandi-new) ` 7,200-7,600; Almond (Girdhi) ` 3,200-3,400; Abjosh Afghani ` 8,000-20,000. Almond Kernel (California-new) ` 445-470 per kg, Almond Kernel (Gurbandi-new) ` 350-450 per kg.

Cashew output doubles in 2 decades, but yield up only 20%


Thu Apr 11 2013

Though raw cashew nut production has more than doubled in the last two decades, poor yield is still a cause for concern compared to competitors such as Vietnam. According to official estimates, raw cashew output in 2012-13 is about 7.3 lakh tons (lt) from an area of over 9.8 lakh hectares. This is against 3.48 lt from 5.65 lakh hectares in 1993-94 and 5 lt from 7.7 lakh hectares in 2002-03.

Concerted efforts by the Directorate of Cashew and Cocoa Development coupled with that of National and State Horticulture Missions have resulted in the growth. However, compared to other global producers such as Vietnam the yield per hectare is less, official sources told Business Line. Vietnam, of late, has emerged as the top producer of the commodity displacing India.

Total raw cashew production in Vietnam in 1993 was 1.86 lt from 69,100 hectares. It shot up to 12.73 lt from a total area of 3.31 lakh hectares in 2011, according to the latest FAO statistics.

The yield from a hectare is currently 3.8 tons in Vietnam against India's 772 kg.

Old plantations

Official sources attributed the low productivity in India to old plantations.

“Most of the cashew plantations in India are senile requiring replanting with high yielding varieties. At the same time, more areas, mainly waste lands lying idle in many States, could be easily brought under cashew by motivating farmers. Timely supply of planting materials, finance and extension services are vital apart from ensuring a remunerative price for the raw nuts,” Dr Abdul Salam, Vice-Chancellor, Calicut University and who had made significant contributions to the development of the crop for over two decades told Business Line.

Processing, exporting

Cashew processing facilities could process around two million tons of raw cashew nuts but the availability of the domestic raw material is limited to nearly one-third of the requirement.

Therefore, the processing-exporting industry has to depend on imported raw nuts for decades. In fact, an equal volume or more of what is produced here is imported every year to keep the factories running as the growth in production of raw nuts does not correspond with the growth in the industry's requirements, said industry sources from Kollam. Imports of raw nuts decreased during April-November 2012 to 6,11,481 tons valued at `3,665.54 crore from 6,94,188 tons valued at ` 4,511.19 crore in the same period a year ago, Cashew Export Promotion Council of India said.

It attributed the decline in imports, despite a drop in the unit value to ` 59.95 a kg from ` 64.99, to weak demand for cashew kernels from overseas markets Exports during the same period stood at 60,585 tons valued at `2,477.42 crore (74,093 tons valued at ` 3,002.34 crore). During the first eight months of the current financial year, the average unit value showed a marginal increase to ` 408.92 a kg from ` 405.21 in the same period last year, they said.

In fact, India has 24 per cent of the global area under cashew and yet the country contributes only 19 per cent of the global production. Vietnam, on the other hand, contributes a significantly higher share of the world production with 10 per cent of the global area under the tree crop.

Source: Hindu business line.

Ghana to double cashew production by 2016


April 8, 2013

cashewGhana’s cashew industry is to receive a major boost with technical and financial support from the government to double current production levels by 2016.As a result, 30 districts in five regions- Volta, Brong Ahafo, Upper West, Northern and Eastern- are to be used as pilot areas to increase production from the estimated 40,000 tons per year to about 80,000 tons.The Minister of Trade and Industry, Mr Haruna Iddrisu, made this known when a delegation from the Ghana Cashew Industry Association, paid a courtesy call on him at his office at the Ministries in Accra.

“The support will go to small holder farmers in each of the six districts to be selected from a district to enable them to increase their production levels to meet the target set and this support will come for them to start immediately this year”, he said.He said it was long overdue for the country to benefit from the cashew potential in the country and expressed the hope that, “an increase in production will bring about more employment while the exports will also bring about additional foreign exchange”.

Mr Iddrisu who is also the Member of Parliament for Tamale Central said the ministry would also ensure that companies in the cashew value chain business were also supported with funds from the Export Development and Agricultural Investment Fund (EDAIF).Presently, more than 95 per cent of cashew produced in the country is exported to other countries including Brazil.Mr Iddrisu described the phenomenon as unfortunate and pledged the support of the government to do all it could to ensure that the potentials in the industry were fully harnessed.For his part, Mr Winfred Osei Owusu, the acting President of the association, was pleased with the intention of the ministry to support the growth of the industry.

He said the potential in the cashew business was huge and noted that “there is a lot of land available to produce the crop and the market too is there but we need the funds to be able to produce to meet the high demand”.Mr Osei, who is also the Chief Executive Officer of West African Market Links, said support for the value chain in the cashew industry was also necessary to help with the processing of the nuts before they were exported.Ms Yayra Afua Amedzro, the convenor of the association, indicated that the farmers in the cashew industry were determined to increase their production and expressed the hope that support from the ministry would go a long way to enable them to achieve their potential.

Source: Daily Graphic

Thứ Tư, 3 tháng 4, 2013

Tanzania: Cashew farmers now want grading system removed


(Mon Apr 02 2013) Smallholder cashew farmers have blamed government for not helping them boost the industry in the country. The blame is contained in findings of a research conducted in Lindi and Mtwara regions by the Agricultural Non State Actors Forum (ANSAF) which said unfavourable grading system remains a major obstacle to the industry’s growth.

The findings of the study were presented in Dar es Salaam at the weekend at a meeting which discussed the sector’s development.

It was revealed that small-scale farmers highly recommend the removed of the grading system saying that it is not effective in giving them favourable prices.  The Dar es Salaam assembly was told that farmers are not informed of the prices before the sale of their produce as they are kept waiting until their crop is bought.

The farmers, the meeting was told, also complained that the second grading system was unfair to them because it does not exist in other countries except in Tanzania.  The first grading system is referred to as ‘Standard’ while the second one is called ‘Undergrade’.

The farmers have appealed to Cashewnut Board of Tanzania (CBT) to revise the unfavourable grading system to boost the income of farmers who basically depend on the crop for their livelihood.  An experienced Indian businessman argued that grading should not be removed since cashew nuts come in different sizes requiring being graded accordingly.

Diana Makule, Principal Economist in the Prime Minister’s Office, said that the government treats each sector in accordance with its contribution to the national economy.  “We look at the role a sector plays in the economy and channel the required support there,” he said.

CBT Director General Mfaume Juma said that not all recommendations are applicable or worthy to be implemented such as the removal of warehouse as it would deny farmers sensible profits.  However, he said CBT has developed a strategy to be implemented in 2020 whereby 20 per cent of the crop will be locally processed.

“Our view is that if we process the crop 100 percent locally then we shall be able to sell more than 100bn/- cashew nuts and also create 40,000 jobs,” he said

Cashew nuts constitute 18 percent of the country’s export earnings and an important source of income for some 250,000 small holder farmers in the southern coastal regions Mtwara, Lindi and part of Ruvum Region.

Source: The Guardian

Thứ Ba, 2 tháng 4, 2013

Declining Trend in the Indian Raw Cashew



Wed Mar 27 2013

If the declining trend in the Indian raw cashew market is just because of the fiscal year-end, then no harm will befall on the improving kernel futures.

If the fall continues, a situation which troubled the entire west African cashew sector during the last year’s season may repeat again. African raw cashew stockist and speculators should thoroughly watch the April-May market, especially the first three weeks of April.

Source: worldcashew.com

Triangular Competition in West Africa



Sat Mar 30 2013

Speculative movement is rising in West Africa; mostly on increased competition between the Indian, Brazilian and Vietnamese processors. Most probably, this bullish trend is due to following factors -

1) Crop failure in Brazil

2) Unpredictability in the Vietnamese harvest

3) Still, there is no quality related improvement in the rain damaged Kerala raw nuts

4) Heavy pieces and very small kernels from this year’s East African imports.

If this trend continues, processors will have no other alternative except a sharp increase their kernel prices.

Source: worldcashew.com