Cashew Kernel Price Today

Cashew Kernel Price Today...

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Thứ Hai, 29 tháng 7, 2013

Which is Better ? Consumption or Above $4.00/lb/W320/Till Christmas

Sun, July 28 2013

Global markets may not cross $4.00 this year, despite there is a chance of an all time high in the Indian cashew kernel during the approaching Hindu festival season.



All time high may not be possible in Dollar terms because of the recent depreciation in the Indian and Brazilian currencies.

We think that $3.50-3.85/lb/W320/According to area-wise and factory-wise grading standards, is quite reasonable for Q3 and Q4.

Consumption should be maintained at all costs while increasing the temporary extra earnings.

Source: worldcashew.com

Chủ Nhật, 28 tháng 7, 2013

Organic substitutes for endosulfan effective: KAU

Saturday, July 27, 2013

Field tests for organic substitutes for endosulfan conducted at Kerala Agricultural University’s Cashew Research Station, Madakkathara, are yielding positive results. “For long, the search for organic alternatives has been on. The health impact of the use of endosulfan in cashew plantations in north Kerala, especially of aerial spraying of the pesticide in Kasaragod, has been much discussed. The KAU’s research on organic cashew farming gained momentum after the State government had banned the use of endosulfan,” said P. Rajendran, KAU Vice Chancellor.



After field trials in KAU’s cashew plantations, scientists vouch for the efficacy of bio-agents such as entopathogenic nematodes, beauveria bassiana, metarhizium anisopliae, verticillium lecanii, hirsutella thompsonii, and pseudomonas fluorescens. To control pests, scientists have also used pongamia oil, tapioca leaf extract, and azadirachtin concentration.

The major pests of cashew are tea mosquito bug and cashew-stem-and-root borer. Twenty pests have been identified by the Cashew Research Station. Two minor pests of cashew — spiralling whitefly and mango leaf webber — too have been spotted in KAU’s cashew plantations in Madakkathara.

“There are reports of endosulfan being smuggled into Kerala from Tamil Nadu. Farmers still use synthetic insecticides, though less toxic ones, in cashew plantations. For organic farming, bio-control measures should be regularly adopted and this would involve increased labour costs. Hence, farmers are reluctant to try them out. Organic cashew nuts fetch higher price that the chemically-grown ones,” said P.B. Pushpalatha, head of the Cashew Research Station and former KAU Registrar.

Gavas Raghesh, assistant professor (Agricultural Entomology), has been consistently carrying out experiments to find whether bio-control agents are effective.

“They indeed are. The plantations should be closely monitored and bio-control agents frequently applied,” he said.

Fall in crop productivity

According to Economic Review 2012, the area under cashew cultivation declined in Kerala from 1.25 lakh hectares (ha) in 1988-89 to 44,000 ha in 2010-11. In 2011-12, there was 23.3 per cent increase in the farming area.

Kerala’s share in cashew farming in the country came down from 23 per cent in 1987-88 to 5.4 per cent in 2011-12. The share of production declined from 31 per cent to 5.3 per cent in the same period. In contrast, farming area and production are increasing steadily in other cashew-producing States.

Cashew crop productivity in Kerala, which was around 900 kg a ha in the late 1980s, declined from 1995-96 onwards, touching 562 kg a ha in 1998-99 and thereafter hovering around 800 kg a ha. In 2011-12, it further declined by 14 per cent.

“Cashew farmers should discard conventional thinking and innovate. The KAU has found that inter-cropping (practice of growing two or more crops in proximity) may help cashew farmers. They may grow pepper, passion fruit, and pineapple in cashew fields. The research station has tried out all these crops and found it profitable. Some cashew farmers in Mananthavady in Wayanad district are already growing pepper in cashew fields,” said Ms. Puspalatha.
Cashew apple products

She said 60 to 75 per cent of cashew apple produced in Kerala was being wasted.

The research station has spent much energy in formulating cashew apple processing methods and developing products such as vinegar, jam, halwa, candy, pickles, cashew apple soda, and cashew apple chocolate. Two or three cashew apple processing units have been set up in the private sector under KAU’s guidance. The KAU has also provided 2.23 lakh cashew grafts to farmers since 2008.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/

Thứ Năm, 25 tháng 7, 2013

Small increase in Brazilian cashew price

Tue, July 23 2013

Cashew nut prices received by producers went up slightly in two of three of the most important producers states in Brazil in June, according to a new monthly report issued by the country's National Supply Company (CONAB).



Producer prices in Piauí and Ceará went up by one centavo to BRL1.44 (USD3.22) and BRL1.51 per kg, respectively. On the other hand, prices in the state of Rio Grande do Norte remained unchanged at BRL1.58/kg.

Source: agra-net.com

Thứ Hai, 22 tháng 7, 2013

Which is Better ? Consumption or Rs7000/tin/11.340kgs/W320 During Diwali

July 21st, 2013 

In India, speculators are trying their best to increase the kernel market to a new high. Most probably, bullish rumor kings are enjoying their most fortunate time.
‘It may be a just rumor today but it will become the actual market tomorrow’ – This is the situation.

But sellers’ should try to maintain the current consumption level throughout the calender year. Abnormal rise in the kernel market might result in consumption slowdown. We think that Rs5950 – 6300 for W320/tin/11.340 kgs/according to grading standards/Goa-Mangalore, is quite reasonable as there is no raw cashew shortage.
Source: World Cashew

Thứ Bảy, 20 tháng 7, 2013

Tanzania: Cashewnut Sector Yearns for Investors

5 JULY 2013


CASHEWNUT Board of Tanzania (CBT) has appealed to the government, stakeholders and other development partners to invest heavily in the cash crop processing factories and save billions that the country loses through exporting raw cashew.

CBT Quality Assurance Manager Godlove Myinga said that over 90 per cent of the cash crop is exported in raw form, with only 10 per cent processed domestically. He said that it was high time all players in the cashew sector looked for investors in cashew processing factories to create employment and increase the value of exported products.
Mr Myinga said that earlier the country had about 12 factories for processing cashew nuts but in the 1990s all were sold to private firms to rescue the market for raw cashew produced although they have remained idle.
He noted that currently there are only three factories Olam Tanzania Ltd (Mtwara), Korosho Africa (Tunduma, Newala and Mtwara) and Mohamed Enterprises (Dar es Salaam)--that process the cash crop, although they can hardly absorb the entire cashew produced in the country.
"Some farmers apply manually operated machines to process cashew-nut, actually, it is very difficult to have output by using these hand tools as they are time consuming while output is very minimal," Mr Myinga explained.
According to Mr Myinga, Cashew-nut Board is in talks with National Social Security Fund (NSSF) for the Fund to invest in the sector by operating four processing factories. Being in the ninth position in the largest world producing cashew and third in Africa after Nigeria and Ivory Coast, Tanzania produces averagely 120,000 metric tonnes of cashew, annually.
Mr Myinga explained that despite the board's role of facilitating and supporting researches and development of the cashew-nut industry, there are still number of challenges including poor infrastructures and loans to farmers that needed immediate intervention.
Source: All Africa

Mozambique: Growth in Food Production

18 JULY 2013


Maputo — Mozambique's Ministry of Agriculture has announced that food production grew by 5.6 per cent during the latest agricultural season, reports the daily newspaper “Noticias”.
The Ministry released the production figures during the annual meeting of its coordinating council, held in the town of Inhassoro in Inhambane province.
These showed that the maize harvest was 1.5 million tonnes, with 395,000 tonnes of pulses, 171,000 tonnes of oilseed, 5.3 million tonnes of cassava, 205,000 tonnes of potato and 586,000 tonnes of sweet potato.
In addition, the country produced 11,500 tonnes of beef, 984,000 tonnes of pork, 1.9 million litres of milk, 49,000 tonnes of chicken and 8.5 million dozens of eggs.
As for the country's livestock herd, cattle grew by 1,300 head, with an additional 3,000 goats. A further 1,900 oxen were available for traction.
According to the Minister of Agriculture, Jose Pacheco, the harvest resulted in a substantial reduction in imports of vegetables and chicken.
However, he told the opening of the conference that the harvest had been hit by a combination of climatic factors including both drought and floods. This led to a decline in cereals, particularly rice, by about five per cent.
Pacheco congratulated the cotton sector for reaching a record production of 184,000 tonnes.

The cashew nut harvest produced 65,000 tonnes, cane sugar 3.4 million tonnes, citrus fruit 49,000 tonnes and banana 470,000 tonnes.
The coordinating council brings together members of the consultative council, provincial directors, and other agriculturalists.
Source: All Africa

Cote d'Ivoire: Smuggling Devours Ivoirian Cashew Revenue

13 JUNE 2013


Abidjan — About a third of Côte d'Ivoire's cashew nuts are smuggled abroad every year, robbing the country of a valuable income stream.

"More than 100,000 tons of cashew nuts are illegally exported every year," said Siaka Coulibaly, the chief of staff at the Ministry of Agriculture.
It is estimated that 150,000 tons of cashew nuts were smuggled through the northern and eastern borders of the country in 2011, representing a US$130 million loss to the national economy and a $3 million state fiscal revenue loss, a UN expert panel said in an April 2013report.
Former New Forces rebels in the current administration of President Alassane Ouattara are part of a "military-economic" network smuggling cocoa, cotton, cashew nuts and other natural resources mainly to Ghana, said the report.
"The network also systematically impedes proper control and interdiction of smuggled goods by the recently redeployed state authorities such as the police, the gendarmerie, the customs authorities and the water and forestry police," it said.
Cashew nut production has grown steadily in the past decade to become the country's third export produce after cocoa and coffee.
Côte d'Ivoire is the world's second largest cashew nut exporter. This year's output is estimated to be 480,000 tons, 50,000 tons more than in 2012, according to the Cotton and Cashew nut Regulatory Authority (ARECA).
Cashews are mainly grown in Côte d'Ivoire's north and northeast where they were introduced in the 1960s to counter desertification. Production rose from 75,000 tons in 2002 to 430,000 tons in 2012, said Kassoum Bamba, an economist in the commercial capital Abidjan.
"In 10 years cashew nut production has risen massively and it could become the [country's] top export earner in the near future," Bamba told IRIN.
Some 250,000 farmers grow cashews and the sector employs 2.5 million people directly and indirectly. About 98 percent of the crop is exported to India. In 2012 it earned Côte d'Ivoire $292 million, according to ARECA.
Farmers said smuggling is driven by better prices in Ghana.
"The fixed benchmark prices are often adhered to for about two weeks after which the buyers offer lower prices. We are therefore forced to turn to Ghanaian markets. We sell to whoever offers the best price," said Salomon Kobenan, a farmer in Côte d'Ivoire's eastern Tabagne area.
The product is smuggled by road. "There are also back roads through the villages to avoid police check-points," said farmer David Kessia.
In Ghana "buyers pay [the equivalent of] the Côte d'Ivoire benchmark prices. Some farmers smuggle out the cashews in food transport trucks," explained Bernard Kouamé, another cashew producer.
The government, in consultation with members of the cashew sector, has set benchmark prices at 200 CFA francs (four US cents) per kilo down from 310 CFA francs last year.
The Agriculture Ministry's Coulibaly said: "For the current harvesting season [May-June] all producers have been warned [against smuggling] and road inspections have been set up.
If the producers collude to fraudulently export cashew nuts, we will all lose because it's the taxes that enable the government to initiate development."
Weak processing
Less than one percent of Côte d'Ivoire's cashews are processed locally although the country has six main cashew nut processing factories able to handle 50,000 tons of raw nuts, or 11 percent of the total harvest.
"Lack of processing is one of the main hurdles to better earnings for farmers and developing the sector. The factories have a very low processing capacity," said economist Bamba.
Henriette Kobenan, who heads a 150-strong women's group in eastern Côte d'Ivoire, said they processed 50 tons of cashew nuts in 2012, earning them $2,350. The group hopes to double its processing capacity this year.
"It's quite a small amount, but we have seen some progress in recent years... which has improved our earnings, but we need to do more," Kobenan said. Cashew processing involves shelling the nuts for export and sometimes roasting them for domestic consumption.
[This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations.]
Source: All Africa

Guinea Bissau: Hunger Warning for Guinea-Bissau As Cashew Price Dips

18 JULY 2013

Dakar — A slump in cashew nut prices in Guinea-Bissau has left nearly half of the population eking out food, with families skipping meals or selling livestock to survive until the next harvest in September, aid groups say.



The average price per kg of cashews is 112 CFA francs (two US cents) - the lowest yet - down from an average of 300 CFA in 2012. The 63 percent drop is due to plummeting international prices, reduced demand from Guinea-Bissau's main cashew importer (India), the April 2012 coup, disagreements between the government and traders on benchmark price as well as banks' decision to reduce loans to traders.
"The result is a significant decrease of [people's] food security which obliges them to revert to coping mechanisms such as skipping meals, reducing food intake, selling animals and so on," Ussama Osman, the World Food Programme (WFP) country director in Guinea-Bissau, told IRIN.
This year marks a second consecutive year of falling cashew nut prices. In July 2012 the country exported 60,000 tons of cashew nuts compared to more than 100,000 tons by the same time in 2011.
Eighty percent of Guinea-Bissau's 1.6 million people are involved in cashew nut production. Farmers sell their produce basically to buy food, or they barter cashew nuts for food. The terms of exchange have also worsened. One kilo of rice now "costs" 3kg of cashew nuts, up from an exchange rate of 1:1, Osman explained.
"People's diet is becoming very poor. They stick to the basic food [rice] but the terms of exchange affect the quality and quantity of their food intake," he said. "Forty-eight percent of the entire population faces a huge food gap during this lean period that requires an emergency intervention."
A June rapid food security assessment conducted by WFP, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), Guinea-Bissau's Ministry of Agriculture, the National Cashew Nut Agency and the National Institute of Statistics in seven of the country's nine regions found that only 8 percent of those interviewed had cereal stocks to last one and a half months.
Some 38 percent of this year's harvest has not been sold due to the poor prices. Rice imports, which depend on cashew revenue, are expected to be low, "thus combining lack of access and availability of the main source of food during the lean season," said Patrick David, FAO's regional food security analyst based in Dakar.
Over-reliance on cashews
Cashews account for 90 percent of Guinea-Bissau's exports and 45 percent of its GDP. With the withdrawal of budgetary support by key lenders following the 2012 coup, the government will face difficulty in paying public service salaries after the cashew harvesting season ends in September, the International Monetary Fund foresees.
Over the years, farmers have converted swathes of forest into cashew orchards and increasingly rely on the land-extensive and low-labour- intensive crop, thus drastically reducing cereal production. Cashew revenue funds tin roofing for houses, marriages, feasts, funerals, bicycles and buying rice among other things, explained Marina Temudo, an agronomist at the Portugal-based Tropical Research Institute (IICT).
"The country has been transformed into a huge cashew tree plantation. This has both economic and environmental hazards. While farmers are now aware of the economic perils of being exclusively dependent upon one cash crop whose market is highly unstable, they have still no idea of the risks of mono-cropping in terms of pests and diseases," Temudo told IRIN.
"The change from a relatively broad-based food provisioning to almost full dependence on one cash crop is not without shortcomings for farmers' livelihoods. Food insecurity and indebtedness are growing as a result of the combined effects of a reorientation of the farming systems towards cashew production and dependence upon the market for food supply, as well as the consequences of climate change and the increased use of credit to solve pre-harvest food shortages."
Farmers should diversify, said Temudo, noting that some farmers have begun switching to food production. "This process should be supported by external agents and donors with incentives for food production and processing facilities," she said.
The current crisis is forcing some farmers to sell their yet-to-be-harvested food crops at half price in order to buy staples, WFP's Osman explained. The organization has seen funding for basic nutrition and food security programmes frozen since the coup.
"There is need for immediate financial support from the donors. They have to realize that political pressure, sanctions and boycott are punishing the most vulnerable. A gesture to these people is needed immediately," he said.
[This report does not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations.]
Source: All Africa

Thứ Sáu, 19 tháng 7, 2013

Dry fruit prices soar in local markets

 Bangalore  July 18, 2013

The recent depreciation of the  has hit the  trade. Last month, the prices of  and  jumped 11 per cent and 17 per cent, respectively, in major wholesale markets.




At 7,00,000 tonnes a year, India imports about half its raw cashew nut requirement; for almonds, it relies entirely on imports of 70,000 tonnes a year. While cashew nut is sold in the domestic market, as well as exported, almonds are sold in local markets alone. The wholesale prices of these two varieties of nuts have increased in major wholesale markets across Mumbai, Delhi, Chandigarh and Mangalore.

"The impact of the rupee depreciation on cashew nut is neutral when it is further exported. Only when it is sold in the domestic market would there be an impact. India exports an average 7,500 tonnes of cashew kernels a month. The prices of raw cashew nuts have declined to $800 a tonne from $1,100 a tonne, providing some relief to importers," said G Giridhar Prabhu, a Mangalore-based exporter and former vice-chairman, Cashew Export Promotion Council of India.

The price of cashew kernels in Mangalore has increased to Rs 529 a kg (ex-factory) from Rs 476 a kg about a month ago. The price of the Mangalore export quality specialty (W320 grade) rose 8.3 per cent to Rs 458 a kg from Rs 423 a kg.

In the wholesale markets of Chandigarh and Delhi, almond prices have risen 17 per cent to Rs 550 a kg, against Rs 470 a kg a month ago; in Mumbai, prices rose to Rs 590 a kg from Rs 505 a kg. However, in the retail market, almonds are sold at Rs 650-800 a kg, while cashew kernels are sold at Rs 750-800 a kg.

"The rupee depreciation has had an impact on almond prices. In addition, production has declined in the US, following a drought in California, a major producer of almonds. As a result, supply has fallen drastically," said Rahul Kamath, partner, Bola Surendra Kamath & Sons, and a Mangalore-based trader of dry fruits. He added in wholesale markets in India, almond prices were likely to stand at Rs 600 a kg by Diwali.

"With the festival season round the corner and the beginning of the month of Ramzan, prices of dry fruits are set to increase further in retail markets. Once the retailers and super bazaars exhaust old stocks, the new prices would kick in," Prabhu said.

In the past month, prices of pistachio rose 15-20 per cent. Currently, these are sold at Rs 1,000-1,250 a kg, depending on quality. Anjir (figs) prices stand at Rs 350-550 a kg in retail markets.

HIGH & DRY
|Prices of raw cashew nuts have declined to $800 a tonne from $1,100 a tonne
|In wholesale markets of Chandigarh & Delhi, almond prices have risen 17% to Rs 550 a kg
|In Mumbai markets, almond prices have risen to Rs 590 a kg from Rs 505 a kg
|In wholesale markets, almond prices are likely to stand at Rs 600 a kg by Diwali

Mahesh Kulkarni


Source: business-standard.com

Thứ Tư, 17 tháng 7, 2013

Vietnam: Half-year cashew exports increase in volume and value

Mon July 15 2013

Vietnam hopes to ship 95,000 tons of cashew in the second half of the year, bringing the year’s total to 210,000 tons, an increase of five percent over last year, according to the Vietnam Cashew Association (Vinacas). Speaking at a conference held in Ho Chi Minh City on July 12 to review the industry’s performance in the first half of this year, Dang Hoang Giang, Vinacas general secretary, said some 115,000 tons of cashew worth 716 million USD were exported in the period.



This represented a year-on-year increase of 30.3 percent in volume and 18.8 percent in value, he said. However, the average export price for the period was 6,185 USD per ton, down 9.46 percent against the same period last year, he said.

The US remained the biggest importer of Vietnamese cashew, followed by China , EU and Australia . Giang said cashew businesses have encountered many difficulties in the first half of the year, including shrinking output and a shortage of working capital.

Cashew output last year was just 264,810 tons, compares to 301,730 tons in the preceding year. The output for this year would be even lower, he said. For the second half of the year, there are both positive and negative signs for the cashew industry, according to Giang.

Regarding the negative aspects, he said the world economy has been recovering very slowly from the prolonged slump. In addition, India recently raised its import duties on cashew nut, causing difficulties for Vietnamese exporters.

But the appreciation of the US dollar against the Vietnamese dong and the stimulation packages launched by big markets like the US, Japan and the EU to increase local consumption are positive factors, he said. Vinacas forecasts that demand for cashew in the world market will increase from now to the end of the year, given that many festivities take place during this period.

To meet its export target, Vietnam would need to import about 180,000 tons of raw cashew in the remaining months of the year for processing, Giang said. Domestic processing companies imported 220,000 tons of raw cashew in the first half of the year, up nearly 88.9 percent from the same period last year, mostly from Cambodia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea Bissau and Indonesia.-VNA

Source: VNA

Thứ Hai, 15 tháng 7, 2013

Reviving cashew production

Sat July 13 2013

THE Philippine government agencies are making steps in order to revive the cultivation and processing of cashew to make them more productive. Why revive cashew farming? There are many reasons why cashew is a good crop to focus on, especially nowadays when there are so many unemployed hands in the rural areas.



Global production


IN 2010 the Philippines ranked seventh among the top 10 cashew producers, which  included Vietnam, 958,000 metric tons; India, 695,000 MT; Nigeria, 580,761 MT; Côte d’Ivoire, 246,383 MT; Brazil, 220,505 MT; Indonesia, 145,000 MT; the Philippines, 111,993 MT; United Republic of Tanzania, 79,100 MT; Mozambique, 67,846 MT; and Guinea-Bissau, 64,650 MT.

Why revive cashew?

IN 2000 the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reported that 2 million tons of cashew nut recorded an estimated value of more than $2 billion. The cashew industry ranks third in the world production of edible nuts.

Cashew kernels are ranked as either the second or third most expensive nut traded in the United States. Cashew nuts have a well-established market in the United States with a great variety of uses. Retail prices range from about $4 to $11 per pound ($9 to $23 per kilogram) depending on the size of nut and the packaging.

Three main cashew products are traded in the international market—raw nuts, cashew kernels and cashew nut shell liquid. A fourth product, the cashew apple, is generally processed and consumed locally. Local producers cannot meet the demand for cashew nuts. Key informant interviews with selected local cashew vendors in the municipalities of Roxas, Taytay, El Nido and Aborlan showed that the supply of nuts (raw or processed) cannot match the demand of importers. The buyers mentioned included those from Antipolo, Selecta and Australia.

Starting with small revival steps


RECENTLY, the government, led by the Department of Agriculture-Palawan Agricultural Extension Station (DA-Paes), convened an assessment-brainstorming workshop on establishing COE on cashew.

This COE would take the lead in developing new environment-friendly, high-yielding and disease-resistant cashew varieties, which farmers all over the Philippines could use to rejuvenate their existing old cashew trees.

At DA-Paes, there is currently a gene bank which hosts six promising varieties.
One of these is the Mitra variety, which is known for its high nut weight (13.43 grams). In the past five years, said Engr. Elmer Ferry, DA-Paes adopted Roxas, Taytay and El Nido as cashew municipalities; with Paes actively distributing the Mitra variety as part of its revival strategy.

The DA-Paes is also actively engaged in training cooperatives and associations on how to process various cashew products, such as roasted, salted and honey-glazed nuts, wine, butter, nougat, soap, prunes, etc. Producing quality cashew nuts is labor-intensive (e.g., manually cracking the shell and removing the testa from the nut), and requires many workers to do the job.

To unleash the full economic potential of cashew as a dollar earner, the government and the business-sector partner in reviving cashew production (from varietal development to marketing) so that many of the poorer people, particularly the women, in the rural areas, may be benefited.

Source: Businessmirror 

Sri Lanka: boost for cashew cultivation in Kurunegala

Sat July 13 2013

Two hundred thousand cashew plants will be planted this year in 24 divisional secretary divisions of the Kurunegala district Under the Divineguma national development program. The program will be launched by the Sri Lanka Cashew Corporation. Ten thousand (quality R) seeds of cashew were distributed among farmers in the Kurunegala district. Cashew growers will be provided subsidies, know-how and agricultural implements free by the government.



Cashew cultivation will be expanded on a commercial scale as there is a big demand for cashew nuts from Middle East and Western countries. The government has allocated Rs. 50 million for the purpose. One hundred and fifty young boys and girls from the Kurunegala and Puttalam districts will be trained in cashew cultivation. 

Source: sundayobserver.lk/

H1 cashew exports increase in volume and value

Mon July 15 2013



Viet Nam hopes to ship 95,000 tons of cashew in the second half of the year, bringing the year’s total to 210,000 tons, an increase of five per cent over last year, according to the Viet Nam Cashew Association (Vinacas). Speaking at a conference held in HCM City last Saturday to review the industry’s first-half performance, Dang Hoang Giang, Vinacas general secretary, said some 115,000 tons of cashew worth US$716 million was exported in the first half of the year.

This was a year-on-year increase of 30.3 per cent in volume and 18.8 per cent in value, he said.
However, the average export price for the period was $6,185 per ton, down 9.46 per cent against the same period last year, he said. The US remained the biggest importer of Vietnamese cashew, followed by China, EU and Australia. Giang said cashew businesses have encountered many difficulties in the first half of the year, including shrinking output and a shortage of working capital.

Cashew output last year was just 264,810 tons, compared to 301,730 tons in the preceding year. The output for this year would be even lower, he said. For the second half of the year, there are both positive and negative signs for the cashew industry, he added.

Regarding the negative aspects, Giang said the world economy had been recovering very slowly from the prolonged slump. In addition, “India recently raised its import duties on cashew nut, causing difficulties for Vietnamese exporters.” But the appreciation of the US dollar against the Vietnamese dong and the stimulation packages launched by big markets like the US, Japan and the EU to increase local consumption were positive factors, he said. Vinacas forecasts that demand for cashew in the world market will increase from now to the end of the year, given that many festivities take place during this period.

Raw material imports

To meet its export target, Viet Nam would need to import about 180,000 tons of raw cashew in the remaining months of the year for processing, Giang said. Domestic processing companies imported 220,000 tons of raw cashew in the first half of the year, up nearly 88.9 per cent from the same period last year, mostly from Cambodia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Nigeria, Guinea Bissau and Indonesia.

Nguyen Van Chieu, Vinacas deputy chairman, said Viet Nam can currently process more than 800,000 tons of cashews a year, but local supply accounts for less than half this capacity. As a result, the country had to import a large volume of raw cashew from other countries, he said.

However, representatives of enterprises have complained about the poor quality of imported raw cashew, especially from Africa, saying they were mixed with contaminants including cashew skins, rotten branches and cashew sprouts, Vinacas chairman Nguyen Duc Thanh told the conference. The country must have regulations to control the quality of imported raw material, Thanh said.

The association had agreed to establish a council to provide consultancy services on raw cashew imports, he added. Chieu said the council would work to reduce and prevent risks involved in raw material imports. The results of a two-year review on the use of machinery in processing cashew were also presented at the meeting. The report says that overall, higher economic efficiency has been achieved through reduction in costs and time, as well as improved product quality. Cashew enterprises should focus on improving their production technology even further in order to ensure their sustainable development, the report says.

Source: Talk Vietnam

Chủ Nhật, 14 tháng 7, 2013

Dry Raw Cashew Strengthens in Maharashtra

July 11th, 2013


Raw cashew market is increasing in India following the festive demand in cashew kernel. But Indian buyers are showing more and more buying interest in their locality or only in the inter-state transactions.

Import is now much cheaper but small and medium-scale processors have moved towards Maharashtra for the reliable quality.
Source: World Cashews

Reviving cashew production

 JULY 14, 2013

THE Philippine government agencies are making steps in order to revive the cultivation and processing of cashew to make them more productive. Why revive cashew farming? There are many reasons why cashew is a good crop to focus on, especially nowadays when there are so many unemployed hands in the rural areas.
Global production
IN 2010 the Philippines ranked seventh among the top 10 cashew producers, which  included Vietnam, 958,000 metric tons; India, 695,000 MT; Nigeria, 580,761 MT; Côte d’Ivoire, 246,383 MT; Brazil, 220,505 MT; Indonesia, 145,000 MT; the Philippines, 111,993 MT; United Republic of Tanzania, 79,100 MT; Mozambique, 67,846 MT; and Guinea-Bissau, 64,650 MT.
Reviving cashew production
Why revive cashew?
IN 2000 the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization reported that 2 million tons of cashew nut recorded an estimated value of more than $2 billion. The cashew industry ranks third in the world production of edible nuts.
Cashew kernels are ranked as either the second or third most expensive nut traded in the United States. Cashew nuts have a well-established market in the United States with a great variety of uses.
Retail prices range from about $4 to $11 per pound ($9 to $23 per kilogram) depending on the size of nut and the packaging.
Three main cashew products are traded in the international market—raw nuts, cashew kernels and cashew nut shell liquid. A fourth product, the cashew apple, is generally processed and consumed locally.
Local producers cannot meet the demand for cashew nuts. Key informant interviews with selected local cashew vendors in the municipalities of Roxas, Taytay, El Nido and Aborlan showed that the supply of nuts (raw or processed) cannot match the demand of importers. The buyers mentioned included those from Antipolo, Selecta and Australia.
Starting with small revival steps
RECENTLY, the government, led by the Department of Agriculture-Palawan Agricultural Extension Station (DA-Paes), convened an assessment-brainstorming workshop on establishing COE on cashew.
This COE would take the lead in developing new environment-friendly, high-yielding and disease-resistant cashew varieties, which farmers all over the Philippines could use torejuvenate their existing old cashew trees.
At DA-Paes, there is currently a gene bank which hosts six promising varieties.
One of these is the Mitra variety, which is known for its high nut weight (13.43 grams). In the past five years, said Engr. Elmer Ferry, DA-Paes adopted Roxas, Taytay and El Nido as cashew municipalities; with Paes actively distributing the Mitra variety as part of its revival strategy.
The DA-Paes is also actively engaged in training cooperatives and associations on how to process various cashew products, such as roasted, salted and honey-glazed nuts, wine, butter, nougat, soap, prunes, etc.
Producing quality cashew nuts is labor-intensive (e.g., manually cracking the shell and removing the testa from the nut), and requires many workers to do the job.
To unleash the full economic potential of cashew as a dollar earner, the government and the business-sector partner in reviving cashew production (from varietal development to marketing) so that many of the poorer people, particularly the women, in the rural areas, may be benefited.
Source: Business Mirror

Sri Lanka: Boost for cashew cultivation in Kurunegala

13 July 2013

Two hundred thousand cashew plants will be planted this year in 24 divisional secretary divisions of the Kurunegala district Under the Divineguma national development program. The program will be launched by the Sri Lanka Cashew Corporation. Ten thousand (quality R) seeds of cashew were distributed among farmers in the Kurunegala district. Cashew growerswill be provided subsidies, know-how and agricultural implements free by the government.
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Cashew cultivation will be expanded on a commercial scale as there is a big demand for cashew nuts from Middle East and Western countries. The government has allocated Rs. 50 million for the purpose. One hundred and fifty young boys and girls from the Kurunegala and Puttalam districts will be trained in cashew cultivation.
Source: sundayobserver.lk

Ghanaian ambitions of massive cashew expansion

Thu July 11 2013



The global agricultural sector is going to have to become more entrepreneurial in years to come if food supply is to keep up with rising demand.

This is something that occurred to me this week after meeting for coffee with a PhD student who is writing his thesis on African agricultural development.

Source: agra-net.com