Cashew Kernel Price Today

Cashew Kernel Price Today, September 09, 2017

W240: 5.20-5.25; W320: 5.05-5.15;

W450/ SW320/ LBW: 4.9-4.95;

DW: 4.5-4.6; WS/WB: 4.35-4.6;

LP: 3.75-3.85 (SP: Limited)

(Unit: USD/ Lb FOB HCMC/ Flexi packs)

Note: The above selling prices for non-Chinese markets/ Prompt shipment.

Thứ Hai, 30 tháng 3, 2015

India: Almond, its kernel prices rise on pick-up in demand

March 30, 2015 


Barring a rise in almond and its kernel prices on the back of pick-up in demand from retailers, other dry fruits held steady at the wholesale market in the national capital today.Traders said increased demand from retailers amid restricted supplies from producing belts mainly led to the rise in almond and its kernel prices.

Almond (California) rose by Rs 50 to Rs 21,750 per 40 kg.

Its kernel followed and edged up by Rs 2 to Rs 757-777 per kg.

Following are today's quotations (per 40 kg):

Almond (California) Rs 21,750, Almond (Gurbandi-new) Rs 8,300-8,400; Almond (Girdhi) Rs 6,300-6,400; Abjosh Afghani Rs 15,000-25,000.

Almond Kernel (California-new) Rs 757-777 per kg, Almond Kernel (Gurbandi-new) Rs 650-740 per kg.

Source: Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi

Turkey: Crunch time as threat to Turkey's hazlenut harvest has wider impact


March 30, 2015


There are hazelnut harvest concerns in northeastern Turkey, the ground zero of international productionFalling supply in hazelnuts following a severe frost 12 months ago has driven up the cost of hazelnut-based products in markets around the world.The peaceful scene at the last harvest at ground zero of international hazelnut production – northeastern Turkey – belied a growing industry concern.Falling supply following a severe frost 12 months ago has driven up the cost of hazelnut-based products in markets around the world.Turkey’s hazelnuts are produced in a hilly region along the eastern Black Sea coast. About 700,000 hectares – almost the size of county Cork – are harvested every year.But following a winter that saw the heaviest snowfall in decades, this month temperatures dropped to below freezing in many hazelnut-producing regions, raising fears of a repeat of last year’s stunted crop and inflated prices.In a single day one nut-producing town experienced a 21 degree swing in temperature, something that does tremendous damage to early-growing trees.

Farmers working older trees or at high altitudes – hazelnuts grow poorly above 600m – are particularly susceptible to breaks in the weather. Producer Bahtiyar Kudu said that in 2013 local manufacturers offered him six lira (€2.15) a kilo but last year, because of the spring frost, that more than doubled.“This local region is small; there are some hazelnut farms underneath the hills near the rivers. But the ones up the mountains froze [last March],” he said.

March’s frost snap


Farmers last year reported yields back 15 to 40 per cent, while a distributor in the coastal town of Gorele said 2014’s supplies to his distribution company were down 75 per cent on 2013. All attributed the decline to last March’s frost snap, and many fear a repeat scenario this summer following yet another severe winter.Reflecting this concern, in February a kilo of double-roasted hazelnuts climbed to 100 Turkish lira (€36) when three years ago it stood at just 12 lira (€4).With 350,000 tonnes produced last year Turkey is by far the world’s biggest exporter of the hazelnut, netting the economy €2.1 billion. The next biggest producers are Italy, the United States and Azerbaijan.The global shelled hazelnut market was valued at €2.8 billion in 2013, with Turkey exporting to 106 countries. The prized nuts are used in making Nutella, Kinder chocolate and other well-known international food brands.

Confectionery producers turned to using hazelnuts in place of the more expensive cocoa after the second World War, and today nut-based products are acclaimed for their health benefits. But at 100 calories a tablespoon Nutella isn’t easy on the waist.Unsurprisingly some interests are attempting to get ahead in a tightening market.Italian Nutella producer Ferrero Group bought a large production company in Turkey with revenue valued at €370 million last July, and bought €750 million worth of hazelnuts from Turkey last year alone.Turkey keeps 15 per cent of its total production for in-country consumption.Local experts in Turkey were coy about how the 2015 harvest may yet play out. The Hazelnut Promotion Group said its members thought it too early to say – generally by June producers know how their August harvest is likely to pan out.“This is known as supply-demand equilibrium and the hazelnut market will find its own balance…There is no chance for those [high] prices to continue like this,” the group told Turkey’s state news agency in February.

Ireland’s Nutella obsession


Turkey’s downsized hazelnut crop is likely to affect Irish consumers too. Thousands of jars of Nutella are consumed in Ireland every month to the tune of €4.3 million a year.The Kinder Bueno chocolate bar, 10 per cent of which is derived from hazelnuts, is another big seller in Irish shops. Both are owned by Ferrero, which is now the fastest growing confectionery company in Ireland.Millions of euro worth of hazelnuts are imported into Ireland in the form of confectionery goods. In addition to these prepared confections, Ireland imported €430,000 worth of dried and fresh hazelnuts between January and November last year. The nut is regularly used in salads, the production of cooking oil and in soups.International market watchers now say they expect hazelnut supplies to run out before the 2015 crop becomes available for shipping next September or October.

“It looks like crops are not going to be particularly large again this year,” said trader Adam Johnston of the Edinburgh-based Freeworld Trading company.“The chatter I’ve heard so far is that anything over 500,000 tonnes [for Turkey’s total 2015 harvest] will probably see a decrease in the price, but at the moment it doesn’t look like it’s going to reach that,” he said.And with Turkey’s lira losing 20 per cent of its value against the dollar over the last year, foreign currency reserves in the form of strong exports of the famed and fabled hazelnut have never been more critical to Turkey’s government.Instead Turkey’s hazelnuts are looking like leaving a bitter taste in President Tayyip Erdogan’s mouth.

Source: http://www.irishtimes.com

India: Socorro hopes for fruitful Cajuchem Fest on April 5


March 28, 2015



On his travels oversees, when people ask cultural activist Marius Fernandes about his roots, he responds saying, "I come from a place where the fruit grows outside the seed." This witty reference to the cashew of Goa undoubtedly takes people by surprise. Fernandes laments that most people associate the exotic fruit with only urrak and feni. In order to showcase the innovative uses of the cashew apple and nut, Fernandes has planned to hold a unique cashew festival in Socorro.

After successfully organizing the Patoieanchem Fest during the monsoon for three consecutive years, Fernandes along with the Socorro socio-art and cultural association, Porvorim, is planning to organize a summer festival called Cajuchem Fest on April 5, coinciding with Easter, behind the Socorro church.

"The festival will be a multicultural event showcasing the importance of the cashew and will help in building communal harmony by attracting people of different communities from all over Goa," said Fernandes.

The festival will highlight the untold story behind the various features of the Goan cashew. For instance, the preparation process of cashew drinks, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic, will be showcased. Bibem (seeds) will be baked and broken for consumption by festival attendees and cashew saplings—hybrid and local—will be distributed to interested farmers.

Scientists from the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and eminent speakers from Green Essentials, an organization that guides people on how to grow food organically at home, have been called upon to give talks on various aspects of cashew cultivation and processing.

Additionally, a cultural programme highlighting the different uses of cashew will be showcased through song and dance. Freshly made food items, squashes and sweets made from cashew will also be served to the attendees in coconut shells, free of cost. Traditional games like biyani (playing with seeds) and more will also be organized.

All this will be materialized in seven stalls representing the seven vaddos of Socorro. The people involved are villagers hailing from these vaddos who have willingly volunteered to be a part of the festival. The cashews being used for the festival are from the people's personal resources.

"The event is being conducted without any sponsorship," said Fernandes, adding, "From the ingredients for food to the decor, everything is from the villagers' homes. We want people to appreciate Goa's cashews and participate in the festival. Something like this cannot be deemed as a commercial event. It's a festival of the people, for the people."

Like the Patoieanchem Fest, the association intends to organize the Cajuchem Fest devoid of political influence or a chief guest and without the use of plastic.

Festival in-charge Fr Santana Carvalho said, "Everything will be prepared by the people of the village. This festival will bring out the flavours of Goa and promote its culture."

SOURCE:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

India: CNSL Should Follow Inflation Rate

March 30, 2015
Buyers usually follow the crude oil market in the CNSL (Cashew Nut Shell Liquid) trade as it is non edible. But this procedure is not always correct.
CNSL has its own uses in many commercial productions like cardanol, paints,rubber, plastics, resins, medicines etc.
It is also a cheaper substitute for costly edible oils in some non edible industrial uses, especially in India.
Then why the price difference between cashew shell and firewood is just 25% ?
Source: http://worldcashew.com/cnsl-should-rise-according-to-inflation-rate/

Thứ Sáu, 27 tháng 3, 2015

India: Raw Cashew Sluggish, Cashew Splits in Demand

March 16th, 2015



Most buyers in India are postponing their purchases to new financial year.  So there is no bulk buying activity in the raw cashew as well as cashew kernel market. But cashew splits is in demand because of shortage owing to wedding season.
West African raw cashew prices are moving down mainly for May-June shipments.
Source: http://worldcashew.com/raw-cashew-sluggish-cashew-splits-in-demand/

Thứ Năm, 26 tháng 3, 2015

India: New centre for cashew cultivation


March 26, 2015


The University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences (UAHS), Shivamogga, will establish a Centre for Development of Cashew Crop in Tumari village in the Sharavathi backwater region in the district, said its Vice-Chancellor C. Vasudevappa. He was speaking after inaugurating a training programme for farmers on cultivation of cashew crop on the university campus in the city on Tuesday. He said that the area of cultivation of cashew crop has enhanced in a rapid manner in Karur and Barangi hoblis in the Sharavathi backwater region.

The proposed Centre would provide training for farmers on scientific methods of cultivation of cashew crop. High-yield varieties of cashew saplings would be distributed. The State government has allocated an amount of Rs. 30 lakh in the 2015-16 State Budget for establishing the Centre, he said. A germplasm bank of cashew saplings has already been established on the main campus of UAHS, Shivamogga, where 20 varieties of cashew have been conserved.

The university is also distributing cashew saplings to interested farmers at a nominal price on its main campus and at its Agricultural and Horticultural Research Stations in Bavikere and in Ullal, he said. He said that returns from cultivation of ginger, which is grown on vast tracts in Sagar, Hosanagar, Shikaripur and Tirthahalli taluk, is no longer lucrative. The decline in ginger yield due to fungal infection and price fluctuations have led to losses for farmers. Farmers growing ginger can switch over to cashew crop, which is conducive for the climate of Malnad region. He urged farmers to experiment with growing cashew under the high-density cultivation method.

Source: newshub.org

India: Cashew delight after mango comes a cropper


March 26, 2015


Call it a twist of fate if you will but horticulturists of north coastal Andhra left mourning the damage caused to their mango plantations by Cyclone Hudhud, have been left surprised by the profuse flowering of cashew in all the three districts. In fact, though the average annual yield of cashew (with kernel) in the region is around 30,000 tonnes, is expected to hit the 45,000 tonnes mark this year despite the havoc wreaked by Hudhud.

Experts and horticulturists point out that while the taller and stronger trees mango trees bore the brunt of Hudhud, the crawly cashew trees, the branches of which are not as brittle as those of mango, sustained comparatively little damage and the ample rains even in the upland areas, where the soils are not water logged, have probably given cashew the advantage it required to blossom. The average annual yield of mango is around one million tonnes, with most of the upland area in the three north coastal districts traditionally being a mango bastion. However, over the last three decades many farmers have taken to planting cashew along with mango for more consistent results.

Experts feel that the bumper cashew crop could also have something to do with high average humidity levels, which ranged between 65% and 80% from June to November. "Various factors contributed to this phenomenon (bumper cashew). There is no doubt that in most of the mixed groves mango took a severe beating and as all the plantation land is upland, there was hardly any water logging, though the ground water levels did improve. The third factor could be the consistent and apt humidity levels," said an official from the horticulture department in Vizag district.

Though experts may not be able to pinpoint one particular reason, the farmers are quite relieved, if not exactly happy. K Ayyappa, a mango and cashew trader from Gajuwaka, who took on lease more than 350 acres of mango and cashew groves said, "I cannot say I'm happy, but I'm definitely relieved. Cashew has definitely come to my rescue. However, I have invested heavily on the plantations post Hudhud and because of a poor mango crop, I might still not break even."

Practicing horticulturist and soil conservation expert VKN Sarma of Vizianagaram district said, "A lot of people are not aware that in South America, cashew, which is native to that continent, is considered an excellent wind breaker. In countries such as Brazil, cashew has been planted extensively in areas prone to hurricanes. In fact, this had been the case all along the north coastal AP coastline as well where the first line of defense was casuarina and the second was cashew. However, unfortunately, species such as eucalyptus, acacia and fancy avenue trees are slowly replacing these varieties. This practice must stop."

Source:http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com

India: Unions angry at move to skip Kochi port in cashew transport

March 26, 2015



Plans by the State port department to encourage movement of raw cashew to Kollam from Tuticorin by the sea route bypassing Kochi has raised the hackles of the port stakeholders here with some of them describing the move as detrimental to the interests of the Kochi port.

Reports indicated that the Kerala State department of ports is working out an agreement with the Tuticorin port authority for direct transport of raw cashew to Kollam, which the department planned to develop as a cashew hub. Until now, cashew used to be shipped to the Kochi port and taken to Kollam by road. Cochin Port Joint Trade Union Forum, a combine of trade unions at the Cochin Port Trust, demanded on Wednesday that Minister for Ports K. Babu must “correct” his stand on the issue as he was well aware of the commercial importance of the Kochi port to Kerala. Cashew is an important commodity for Kochi and while promoting other ports, the interest of the port here should not be sacrificed, said a spokesman for the trade union combine. Kochi port handles about 12,000 TEUs of cashew a year.

Meanwhile, plans to increase coastal cargo movement has received some momentum with a shipping line offering to issue in-transit Bill of Lading for cashew consignments arriving in Kochi, which will simplify clearance procedures for cargo headed for destinations like Kollam.

The offer came at a meeting of stakeholders in Kollam on Monday, which discussed increasing cargo movement through the coastal mode and increasing cargo throughput at the port of Kollam, industry sources said. However, what is urgently required is working out the per unit charges at State-run port, which will bring out the financial feasibility of moving cargo using the coastal waters, they said.

State is planning direct transport of cashew to Kollam.

Source: Hindu business line.

Thứ Ba, 24 tháng 3, 2015

India: ‘Average yield of cashew is 314 kg per hectare in Pudukottai district’

March 25, 2015



Cashew is cultivated in a large scale in this district, next only to Ariyalur and Cuddalore, said Collector S. Ganesh here on Tuesday.

Inaugurating a district-level seminar on cashew cultivation, organised by National Pulses Research Centre, and Directorate of Cashew and Cocoa Development, Kochi, at Vamban Agriculture Science Centre in Alankudi taluk, he said the yield was 801 kg per hectare in Cuddalore district while it was 314 kg per hectare in Pudukottai district.

The average yield in Tamil Nadu is 500 kg while the maximum yield of 1,185 kg is recorded in Maharashtra. High yielding varieties of V.R.I.2 and 3 and V.R.I.4 give a yield of 2,000 to 3,000 kg. Cashew is cultivated in Andhra Pradesh, Maharashtra, Orissa and Tamil Nadu.

Certificates and prizes were distributed to S. Manonmani of Vadakadu for black gram cultivation and M. Thirupathi of Panankulam for brinjal cultivation.

K. M. Shajahan, Joint Director of Agriculture, Sampath Kumar and Arunachalam, Assistant Directors of Horticulture, participated in the seminar.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/average-yield-of-cashew-is-314-kg-per-hectare-in-pudukottai-district/article7030059.ece

India: Varsity to establish centre for cultivation of cashew crop

March 25, 2015
A girl examining cashew fruit at a one-day workshop on the cultivation of cashew nuts in Shivamogga on Tuesday.— Photo: VAIDYA
A girl examining cashew fruit at a one-day workshop on the cultivation of cashew nuts in Shivamogga on Tuesday.— Photo: VAIDYA

The University of Agricultural and Horticultural Sciences (UAHS), Shivamogga, will establish a Centre for Development of Cashew Crop in Tumari village in the Sharavathi backwater region in the district, said its Vice-Chancellor C. Vasudevappa.

He was speaking after inaugurating a training programme for farmers on cultivation of cashew crop on the university campus in the city on Tuesday.

He said that the area of cultivation of cashew crop has enhanced in a rapid manner in Karur and Barangi hoblis in the Sharavathi backwater region.

The proposed Centre would provide training for farmers on scientific methods of cultivation of cashew crop. High-yield varieties of cashew saplings would be distributed. The State government has allocated an amount of Rs. 30 lakh in the 2015-16 State Budget for establishing the Centre, he said.

A germplasm bank of cashew saplings has already been established on the main campus of UAHS, Shivamogga, where 20 varieties of cashew have been conserved.

Saplings distributed

The university is also distributing cashew saplings to interested farmers at a nominal price on its main campus and at its Agricultural and Horticultural Research Stations in Bavikere and in Ullal, he said.
He said that returns from cultivation of ginger, which is grown on vast tracts in Sagar, Hosanagar, Shikaripur and Tirthahalli taluk, is no longer lucrative.

The decline in ginger yield due to fungal infection and price fluctuations have led to losses for farmers.
Farmers growing ginger can switch over to cashew crop, which is conducive for the climate of Malnad region. He urged farmers to experiment with growing cashew under the high-density cultivation method, he said.

P. Narayanaswamy, Director of Research, UAHS, Shivamogga; Vishwanath Shetty, Assistant Director of Research; and Deputy Director of Department of Horticulture M. Vishwanath were present.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/karnataka/varsity-to-establish-centre-for-cultivation-of-cashew-crop/article7030550.ece

Australia: A record 47,000 tonnes of macadamias forecast for 2015 Australian crop, despite cyclone

Updated 2 Mar 2015, 1:02pm
Macadamia nuts on treePHOTO: The Australian Macadamia Society has released an initial forecast of 47,000 tonnes of nut in-shell for 2015. (Kim Honan)
Australian macadamia growers are on track to produce a record crop this year.
The peak industry body has released an initial forecast of 47,000 tonnes of nut in-shell.
The Australian Macadamia Society's chief executive officer Jolyon Burnett said the total crop last year weighed in at 43,600 tonnes.
"It's a very pleasing result, given all the hard work and effort that growers have put in this season," he said.
"We've had a 46,000-tonne crop and it's worth remembering that was when there were a lot less trees and the trees were not as old as they are now.
"In terms of the per tree or per hectare basis, it's probably not the biggest crop we've had, but in terms of absolute volume, if we make that 47,000 tonnes it certainly will be."
A year with a good yield and a good price comes along very rarely and to have your crop virtually wiped out in that sort of a year is absolutely heartbreaking.
Jolyon Burnett, chief executive officer, Australian Macadamia Society
Mr Burnett said the damage caused to farms in Central Queensland by ex-Tropical Cyclone Marcia would have little impact on the overall national crop.
"We have three or four growers around Yeppoon and they've all suffered devastating losses and it's absolutely heartbreaking," he said.
"A year with a good yield and a good price comes along very rarely and to have your crop virtually wiped out in that sort of a year is absolutely heartbreaking, and our thoughts are with them.
"But the good news is across the entire industry we really were extremely lucky and in terms of the total crop very little damage has been done.
"The Hancock Farms has a farm at Rockhampton that sustained a bit of damage, but by and large the industry escaped relatively unscathed."
The heavy rainfall in northern New South Wales delayed the start of harvest, with growers still struggling to get machines onto the orchard floor.
"There's been a few harvest rounds, but in general I think we'll have to wait a couple of more weeks to see harvest begin in earnest," Mr Burnett said.
Seventy per cent of the crop will be exported, with a greater number of macadamias ending up on the Chinese market.
In 2014, nearly 25 per cent of the crop was exported to China. Mr Burnett said the country's demand for the in-shell product continued to grow.
Mr Burnett expected to see a greater percentage of the crop exported to China this year.
"The Chinese public eat nuts by and large in-shell, so rather like we eat peanuts, and that's a really strongly growing sector of the market and delivering good prices at the moment," he said.
Demand is strong across all sectors of the industry and our biggest challenge is that we can't grow enough to satisfy that growing demand.
Jolyon Burnett, chief executive officer, Australian Macadamia Society
"But we still have a very strong demand for the kernel market and I suppose in some way it's an enviable position to be in, to have to make a choice about which markets we service."
Mr Burnett said the demand from China for the in-shell product would put pressure on the kernel market.
"Demand is strong across all sectors of the industry and our biggest challenge is that we can't grow enough to satisfy that growing demand," he said.
"But it does allow processors and exporters to look across a whole range of markets and to try and maximise the return by going for highest value markets, but that has to be balanced also to make sure we take care of long-term sustainable markets that we know that will be there in five, 10, 20 years' time."
By Kim HonanSource: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2015-03-02/bumper-macadamia-crop/6274094

Vietnam: Cashew exporters secure firm foothold in markets

Monday 23/03/2015

Vietnam has secured its place as the world’s top cashew exporter for eight consecutive years, supplying roughly 60 percent of the cashew nuts in the global markets.


According to the Ministry of Industry and Trade, the sector pocketed 276 million USD in revenue during the first two months of 2015, posting an annual increase of 44.7 percent. 

Last year, as many as 1.2 million tonnes of cashew nuts were shipped abroad, generating nearly 2 billion USD and representing the largest figure recorded so far, according to the Vietnam Cashew Association (Vinacas). 

The internationally recognised Vietnamese cashew is now sold in 50 countries, with 30 percent of total exports destined for the US and the remaining for China , the Netherlands , India , Germany , Japan , and others. 

Cashew nuts have become one of the key export staples of Vietnam ’s farming sector, following rice, rubber and coffee. 

Despite challenges in 2015, such as the Euro devaluation and the oil crisis, the cashew market remains relatively stable due to increasing demand, the Vinacas commented, saying this is a good opportunity for businesses to expand the market. 

However, a number of issues require additional attention, such as narrowed growing areas, according to Vinacas Chairman Nguyen Duc Thanh. 

He noted that the country harvests about 400,000 tonnes of raw cashew nuts per year, but the plants are capable of processing up to 1 million tonnes of cashew. Around 50 percent of raw cashew nuts are imported, mainly from Africa , to serve as material supply for processing and exports. 

He recommended developing land area for growing cashews, creating high-yield products, and building a production and sales chain. 

Businesses are also encouraged to forge links with foreign cashew growers, such as those in Cambodia and Laos , to form a stable material area in close proximity to Vietnam to reduce the cost of material import. 

They are also urged to keep close check on imported materials to protect the Vietnamese cashew brand and reputation. 

The sector targets 2.5 billion USD in export revenue in 2015.-VNA