Cashew Kernel Price Today

Cashew Kernel Price Today, September 09, 2017

W240: 5.20-5.25; W320: 5.05-5.15;

W450/ SW320/ LBW: 4.9-4.95;

DW: 4.5-4.6; WS/WB: 4.35-4.6;

LP: 3.75-3.85 (SP: Limited)

(Unit: USD/ Lb FOB HCMC/ Flexi packs)

Note: The above selling prices for non-Chinese markets/ Prompt shipment.

Thứ Sáu, 31 tháng 7, 2015

Cambodian Farmers Try to Cash in on Cashews

Wednesday, 29 July 2015




PHNOM PENH (Khmer Times) – Cambodian farmers want to grow more cashews in response to rising prices. But lack of information and resources is holding them back. This year, cashew prices jumped to $1 per kg, compared to $0.75 per kg one year ago, according to Siv Ngy, president of Cashew Nut Association in Kampong Thom, in central Cambodia. He said this year, farmers in his area are responding to market signals and trying to plant cashews on land that they had been left fallow. Some want to replace existing crops with cashew trees. "World prices for cashews have been rising steadily over the past five to 10 years, and this trend is likely to continue," said Andrew  McNaughton, an international and rural livelihoods consultant and cashew specialist.But many Cambodian farmers do not know how to plant, graft or take care of their trees, said Mr. Siv. “Some farmers don’t have clear vision for increasing the productivity,” Mr. Siv said.  “They plant cashew trees because they just see other people get benefits. But they cannot get what they want, because planting cashew tree is not easy.”Farmers who have adequate knowledge can harvest from three to four tons per hectare. But those without expertise only get one ton per hectare or less. In comparison, Vietnamese farmers can harvest about seven tons per hectare.

Limited Know-How


Kampong Thom is one of Cambodia’s major cashew producing provinces, with 20,000 hectares cultivated last year. Other major producing provinces are: Mondulkiri, Ratanakiri and Kampong Cham. Most cashews are grown by smallholders.Five years ago, Cambodia’s total cashew cultivation area was 69,000 hectares, according to Khan Saban, director of the industrial crops department at the Ministry of Agriculture. Since then, the planted area has increased, but more recent figures are not available. Mr. McNaughton said that Cambodia grows between 60,000 and 100,000 tons of cashew nuts per year, a crop now valued at up to $130 million. Planting new crops is a long-term commitment. Cashew trees take between five to seven years to start producing nuts. New, high-yielding varieties only take three to five years and have better quality nuts. Quicker turn-around is possible by grafting high-yield varieties onto older trees, but few Cambodian farmers have the expertise to do this. Mr. McNaughton said that perhaps only 20 percent of the cashews grown in Cambodia come from high yield strains. “We have a big cultivation area, but cannot produce more effectively from it,” Siv Ngy added.

Growing Demand


Rising prices come from increasing demand for cashews in China, South Korea, India and other countries. Almost all Cambodian cashews are exported to Vietnam, which has facilities to process them. Vietnam is the world’s largest processed cashew exporter. Cashew nuts are harvested between February and May. After harvest, three quarters of the nation’s cashews are exported.The rest are dried, which increases their value by lowering the moisture content. Dried cashews can be sold any time during the year.Experts say most traders operate at a commune or district level before selling to larger traders. Traders are mostly Cambodians and Vietnamese, but some Chinese and Indian traders also operate here.

Lack of Support


Kampong Thom’s Cashew Nut Association complained of insufficient assistance from the government and called for a clear policy to help associations and farmers. “The government has assisted our association and others, but it’s just on paper – it cannot implement,” Siv Ngy said. “We need more action, rather than saying on paper.”Mr. Saban countered that the government is doing the best it can with limited funds. “Actually, government really tries to help farmers and associations for growing and exporting,” he said in an interview. “But honestly, we cannot satisfy them because we lack human resources and money.”

Source: http://www.khmertimeskh.com/news/13835/farmers-try-to-cash-in-on-cashews/

Cote d’Ivoire seeks Afreximbank’s support to boost commerce


Tue July 28, 2015

Image result for Afreximbank

Cote d’Ivoire Government has called on African Export-Import Bank (Afreximbank) to increase its support to the country to enable it to raise its trading activities with other African countries. A statement in Abidjan on Tuesday by the bank, said Ivorian Prime Minister, Daniel Duncan, made the call when he   received the bank’s delegation led by its President, Jean-Louis Ekra.

Duncan said that exchanges with other African countries currently accounted for 34 per cent of Côte d’Ivoire’s total trade volume. He said that the country’s goal was to increase the contribution of African nations to its economy to 50 per cent by 2020.

He identified Nigeria as Cote d’Ivoire’s primary trading partner, and said that the country needed the continued commitment of Afreximbank to enable it to establish local industries. According to him, the country needs the bank’s support particularly in the area of agro-processing, including cocoa, palm oil, rubber and cashew nuts, which need strong local value-addition.

The Prime Minister commended Ekra for his leadership and professionalism which had helped in positioning the bank as a leading financial institution in Africa. He also congratulated Oramah on his appointment as the next president of the bank and pledged Côte d’Ivoire’s continued support to the bank in the implementation of its mandate.

Earlier, Ekra had said that he was in the country to formally introduce the President Designate of the bank to the Ivorian authorities.

He acknowledged Côte d’Ivoire’s sustained support to the bank and said that the branch of the bank, which was recently opened in Abidjan, would greatly improve access of Ivorian businessmen to its services.

Speaking also, the president-designate of the bank pledged his commitment to pursuing the vision instituted by Ekra, adding that he would ensure that the bank remained a true catalyst for Africa’s trade development

The bank, with headquarters in Cairo, was established in October, 1993, by African countries, private and institutional investors in the continent as well as non-African investors. Since 1994, Afreximbank had approved about 35 billion dollars, including about 4.5 billion dollars in 2014, in credit facilities for African businesses.

Source: http://businessdayonline.com

Thứ Ba, 28 tháng 7, 2015

Ivory Coast 2015 cashew output hits record 625,000 T


ABIDJAN, July 27



Ivory Coast's 2015 cashew nut crop jumped by 11 percent to a record 625,000 tonnes compared with the previous year, the West African nation's government said on Monday.In addition to being the world's top cocoa producer, Ivory Coast is also Africa's biggest cashew grower. Its exports of the nut reached 337 billion CFA francs ($571 million) in 2015, the statement said.The increase in cashew exports was boosted by government reforms and investments in the sector, the statement said. A decade ago, Ivory Coast produced around 80,000 tonnes of raw nuts per year.With output growing by over 10 percent annually amid strong demand from Asian countries, the cashew sector attracted the attention of a government keen to kick-start the economy after a decade of war and political chaos that ended in a brief 2011 civil war. ($1 = 590.1500 CFA francs)

(Reporting by Loucoumane Coulibaly; Writing by Bate Felix; Editing by Daniel Flynn)

Source:Reuters

Thứ Sáu, 24 tháng 7, 2015

Cambodia: Cashew Price Soars Amid Overseas Interests


July 24, 2015



The average price of unprocessed cashews in Cambodia during the first six months of the year was over 50 percent higher than during the same period in 2014 due to increased interest from overseas buyers and reduced regional supply, according to industry experts. Chhiv Ngy, president of the Cashew Association of Kompong Thom, said the average price of unprocessed cashews was 4,550 riel (about $1.14) per kilogram between January 1 and the end of June, up from 3,000 riel (about $0.75) during the same period last year.

Mr. Ngy said that since December, increased interest in unprocessed cashews from South Korea, Japan, Canada and Germany had given local farmers more power in negotiating prices with middlemen. “This year, middlemen cannot lower the price when they buy cashews from farmers, which is different from last year,” said Mr. Ngy, whose association comprises 378 member families cultivating 10,000 hectares of land.

Tep Sothun, director of cashew exporter Mekong Rain Natural Foods, said that an overall lower supply of cashews in the region had led more international buyers to turn to Cambodia for the nut, thereby enabling local farmers to fetch higher prices.

“In Asia, countries that used to produce the most cashews…include India, Indonesia and Vietnam,” he said. “After the price of rubber soared earlier, farmers in those countries mostly cut down their cashew trees and grew rubber trees instead.” As the price of rubber dropped, Mr. Sothun said, the price of cashews rose due to high demand.

“That’s why this year, Vietnamese traders and other cashew businesspeople from other countries flocked to Cambodia to find cashews, resulting in a very high price,” he said. Chhean Vongchhay, a cashew trader in Ratanakkiri province’s Banlung City, said that while cashews in his province were less popular due to their smaller-than-average size, demand had also risen in the area. “There are more middlemen in the city competing…to buy cashews from local farmers to sell to Vietnamese traders at Cambodia-Vietnam border areas like Keo Seima and O’Yadaw,” he said.

Economist Srey Chanthy said the higher prices had led many Cambodian farmers to abandon rubber in favor of cashews. “It [Cambodia’s supply of cashews] has been increasing very significantly over the past five years,” he said, noting the country still played a minor role in the nut’s global supply.

Source:https://www.cambodiadaily.com

India: Cashew Bill sent to Subject Committee


July 23, 2015



The Assembly on Monday decided to send the Kerala Cashew Factories (Acquisition) Amendment Bill, 2015 to its Subject Committee.

The Bill proposes to amend certain provisions of the original 1974 Act to empower the government to take over in public interest 10 cashew factories which were returned to their original owners through High Court and Supreme Court orders this year. The government's contention was that it was not given proper notice to challenge the plea of the original owners in court and hence the amendment.

Veteran trade union leader and CPI(M) legislator P.K. Gurudasan accused the government of playing into the hands of the owners. He said none of them would run the factories properly. Their management could result in large-scale unemployment of traditional cashew workers, mostly women. Hence it was imperative that the government acquired the factories to secure workers’ just conditions of service.

Minister P.K. Kunhalikutty said he concurred with Mr. Gurudasan that the interest of thousands of cashew workers was paramount to the government. However, he denied the allegation that the government had played into the hands of the factory owners by colluding with their counsels in court.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/

Thứ Ba, 21 tháng 7, 2015

Tanzania: Cashew nut, coffee exports up

Jul 21, 2015


Coffee and cashew nut have boosted value of traditional exports in the year ended May 2015, as other crops declined, the Central Bank has said.

CashewThe Bank of Tanzania (BoT) said its latest monthly economic report that traditional exports amounted to 906.5 million US dollars up from 843.2 million US dollar in the preceding year.
The improvement was driven by an increase in export value of coffee and cashew nut, as most of the other crops declined.
According to the report, cashew nut exports reached 252.7 million US dollars up from 133.4 million US dollars in the year before, while coffee exports amounted to 149.2 million US dollars up from 129.7 million US dollars of the preceding year.
According to the report, export value of cashew nut improved significantly owing to an increase in export volume and price. The increase in coffee export value was driven by price as export volume declined, the report said.
Global prices for coffee have raised due to declining output from major suppliers particularly Brazil, the source of one-third of the world’s coffee and about half of the world’s Arabica beans.


Reports from coffee global market say drought in Brazil at beginning of crop year has led in global supply deficit and resultant price increase which have nearly doubled this year.
Tobacco exports slightly increased to 360.0 million US dollars from 359.9 million US dollars of the year ending May 2014. Other traditional exports crops such as cotton, tea, cloves and sisal declined in export value, the report shows.
The value of non-traditional exports amounted to 4,112.6 million US dollars, an increase of 9.6 per cent from corresponding period in 2014.
All the non-traditional exports improved, except gold and horticultural products. Earnings from gold, the other main source of foreign income, fell to 1.44 billion US dollars from 1.51 billion US dollars a year ago, reflecting another decline in prices and lower export volumes.
Source: Tanzania Daily News

India: Cashew prices down on easing demand

Jul 21, 2015





Cashew prices fell Rs 5 per kg in the national capital today due to subdued demand from retailers and stockists amid adequate stocks.
Increased arrivals from producing belts against low demand from bulk consumers also put pressure on the cashew prices.
Cashew kernel (No 180, 210, 240 and 230) prices were down by Rs 5 each to settle at Rs 800-850, Rs 720-740, Rs 670-680 and Rs 615-630 per kg, respectively.
Marketmen said slackened demand from retailers and stockists against increased arrivals, weighed on cashew prices.
Following are today’s quotations (per 40 kgs):
Almond (California) Rs 23,200, Almond (Gurbandi-new) Rs 10,500-10,800; Almond (Girdhi) Rs 7,100-7,300; Abjosh Afghani Rs 15,000-20,000.
Almond Kernel (California-new) Rs 790-810 per kg, Almond Kernel (Gurbandi-new) Rs 750-825 per kg.

Source: http://www.siasat.com/news/cashew-prices-down-easing-demand-796405/ 

Thứ Sáu, 17 tháng 7, 2015

India: Downward Spiral in Raw Cashew Market

July 17th, 2015



There is a steep decline in raw cashew prices across South India. The downward trend is mainly because of huge imports from West Africa. The quality of imports is said to be satisfactory when compared with past few years. However the present quality is not as good as last year’s imports. Another reason for the fall is increase in the cost of production.
Many factories are for sale in Maharashtra and Kerala.

Domestic raw cashew prices were too high in Maharashtra during the procurement season and there was high dependence on Mumbai and adjoining kernel markets. Therefore the local processors should target corporate retailers and export market else they might face shutdown.
Source: World Cashew Blog

Thứ Năm, 16 tháng 7, 2015

New bio-based plasticiser from cashew nut oil shows better efficiency



Tue July 14, 2015


Pilot tests of a new bio-based plasticiser for soft PVC have reportedly shown better efficiency, processability and cost reduction than commercial counterparts.

Produced as part of the Placard project, a 32-month long European eco-innovation initiative, the new plasticiser has a focus on end-use applications in the construction sector.

It is produced by chemical modification of cardanol, an industrial-grade, yellow oil obtained by vacuum distillation of cashew nut shell liquid. By using a by-product such as cashew nut shells, the Placard plasticiser does not create pressure on food resources. Production of the Placard plasticiser on a pilot scale was carried out at Italian R&D specialist, Serichim, whilst tests were conducted by Italy’s University of Salento that compared properties from different high/low molecular weight phthalates and non-phthalates plasticisers.

According to the results, Placard showed better plasticising efficiency than DEHP and DOTP, enabling raw material savings. Processability and energy cost reductions were other parameters that demonstrated better performance compared to selected commercial plasticisers. Remaining tested parameters were comparable with other selected plasticisers and showed good stability of properties over time.

Additional results, such as ability to facilitate recycling, will be further investigated and quantified. They will be presented in internal meetings and at targeted conferences by the trade association for European plastics converters, EuPC, which is in charge of the dissemination activities as well as Kommi, the project leader.

Source: http://www.britishplastics.co.uk/News/new-bio-based-plasticiser-from-cashew-nut-oil-shows-better-e/

China remains largest trade partner of Vietnam in 6 months: Hanoi


Jul 13,2015



HANOI, July 13 (Xinhua) -- Vietnam posted 32.1 billion U.S. dollars in trade revenue with China in the first half of 2015, registering the largest amount among other trade partners of the country, Vietnam's General Statistics Office (GSO) said on Monday.

Specifically, during the six-month period, China remained the biggest supplier of commodities for Vietnam with some 24.4 billion U.S. dollars worth of products, up 23.9 percent year-on-year, the GSO said on its website in the June monthly report.Meanwhile, Vietnam exported some 7.7 billion U.S. dollars worth of products to China in the period, up 3.6 percent year-on-year, said GSO.Vietnam mainly exports farm products to China while importing fruit and vegetable, fertilizer, machinery, phone and accessories, steel and material for garment and textile industry, among others.

In H1, Vietnam earned 77.7 billion U.S. dollars from exports to foreign markets, said GSO, adding that the country spent 81.5 billion U.S. dollars on imports.Regarding Vietnam's exports of major agro-forestry-fishery products, China remained the largest consumer.According to a report released by Vietnam's Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD), in H1, Vietnam pocketed 1.318 billion U.S. dollars from exporting 3.055 million tons of rice, down 10.5 percent in value and 6.2 percent in volume year-on- year.China remained the largest importer for Vietnamese rice in the five-month period, accounting for 36 percent of the market share.

However, during the period, Vietnam's rice exports to China witnessed a decrease of 19.61 percent in volume and 22.61 percent in value year-on-year, said MARD.In the six-month period, Vietnam shipped abroad some 614 million U.S. dollars worth of 422,000 tons of rubber, down 5.1 percent in value and up 22.3 percent in volume year-on-year.China, Malaysia and India remained the three largest consumers of Vietnamese rubber, accounting for 72.26 percent of the market share.For exports of cassava and its related products, in H1, Vietnam exported 2.83 million tons of cassava, worth 844 million U.S. dollars, up 50.5 percent in volume and 42.6 percent in value year- on-year.China continued to be the biggest importer of the item, while accounting for 88.71 percent of the market share, up 52.08 percent in volume and 46.28 percent in value year-on-year.

During the period, exports of 150,000 tons of cashew nuts brought Vietnam 1.08 billion U.S. dollars. China was the largest importer of Vietnamese cashew nuts, with 39.98 percent of market share, said MARD.Concerning imports of automobiles, in H1, Vietnam imported over 56,000 completely built up (CBU) units with the greatest figure from China, said the country's Ministry of Planning and Investment (MPI).Specifically, according to Vietnam Customs, during five-month period, Vietnam imported 13,405 CBUs from China, posting a remarkable increase of 327.32 percent compared to the same period of 2014.Regarding foreign direct investment (FDI), during six-month period, China ranked eighth among countries, regions having FDI in Vietnam with 147.38 million U.S. dollars in newly-registered and added capital, said MPI's Foreign Investment Agency.

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/a

China is largest importer of Vietnamese cashew nuts

July 15, 2015




During the period of exports 2015 150,000 tons of cashew nuts brought Vietnam 1.08 billion U.S. dollars. China was the largest importer of Vietnamese cashew nuts, with 39.98 percent of market share, said MARD.

Source: shanghaidaily.com

Thứ Ba, 14 tháng 7, 2015

India: Demand Increases for SSW and W400 Grades

 July 12th, 2015



Once again there is no bulk availability of splits and piece grades in India due to weak monsoon. 

Some food processing industries, especially kaju katli manufacturers are using W400 and other cheaper grades instead of costly pieces. 

The difference between W320 and W400 has narrowed to just Rs300/tin/25 pounds/Goa-Mangalore.

Source: World Cashew

Ghana: Cashew nuts can fetch Ghana 56 million dollars annually

Ghana’s annual revenue from exporting raw cashew nuts is estimated at 56 million dollars, Mr Joseph Yeung, Managing Director of the Mim Cashew Processing Company, has revealed.
He said value of processed cashew kernels, which is 21 per cent of the 65,000 metric tons of the annual raw cashew produced is also expected to earn the country 102 million dollars.
Mr Yeung, disclosed this when Dr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, Minister of Trade and Industry paid a working visit to the company’s plant site at Mim in the Asunafo North Municipality.
He explained Ghana has numerous opportunities from processing cashew nuts and advised the government implement policies that would make the industry attractive for rapid economic transformation and development.
Mr Yeung noted that prior to the border closure by Ivory Coast, the company was able to procure about 50 per cent of raw cashew nuts through Sampa, but now it is forced to purchase nuts from Burkina Faso at high cost and more risk.
He said the company is operating at 60 per cent of its installed capacity and employing more than 1,000 local staff, adding that if it is able to operate fully, the company would require additional 600 staff with a possible income to the community of no less than GH₵ 1,800,000.
Mr Yeung emphasised the need for the government to carry out immediate action to save the “agonising processing industry”, from shutting down, and this he said would be done before the next cashew season in 2016.
“Otherwise the processing industry will be doomed with a huge loss of jobs and revenue to Ghana”.
Mr Yeung said that the current installed cashew processing capacity in the country stands at approximately 70,000 metric tons.
He said the only operational processing this year would only be 5,000 metric tons with 11 out of the 12 existing processors being closed down.
Dr Spio-Garbrah, advised the cashew processing companies to meet and come out with recommendations that would guide the government to design and implement policies to enhance the sector.
He commended the company for the job opportunity it has created for the local people, and assured management that government would ensure that the cashew industry is revived to create more jobs.
Source: ghananewsagency.com

Ghana: Gov’t keen on growing cashew sector

July 14, 2015

Gov’t keen on growing cashew sector
Government will soon evaluate all available remedy options to salvage the collapsing cashew processing industry; one of the key interventions could be a ban on the export of raw cashew nuts (RCN) Mr. Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, Minister for Trade and Industry, has hinted.  
He said it has become imperative to take crucial decisions like banning exports of RCN to protect industries, and that government is awaiting an official report from the cashew processing industry players to better inform any such decision.
“If it becomes necessary to ban RCN exports to reactivate all the closed processing factories we will not hesitate to do so, considering the employment opportunities and other important benefits these factories offer to growth of the economy,” Mr. Spio-Garbrah disclosed when he paid a familiarisation visit to Mim Cashew & Agricultural Products Ltd. (MCAPL) in the Brong Ahafo Region.  
Of the 12 existing cashew processing companies in the country, 11 have currently shut down operations -- with only the Mim Cashew and Agricultural Products Ltd. still in business, but operating below its installed annual production capacity of 7,000 metric tonnes.
The cashew processing industry is bogged-down by a plethora of challenges: insufficient supply of RCN is the principal problem that has forced industries out of business. Shortfall in supply of RCN is the result of limited production in the country, as against higher installed processing capacity amidst excessive export of RCN. Ghana produces about 65,000mt/year while installed processing capacity is currently estimated at 70,000mt.
Until 2013, Ghana used to trade (export and processing) around 150,000-200,000mt of RCN per year -- with the huge deficit supplement imported from Cote d’Ivoire through the borders. The Ivorian Authorities in 2013 banned export of RCN to Ghana via the border. The situation has since pushed the RCN price up by 166% from GH¢1.5 per a kilo to GH¢4, thus making it non-competitive for processors to buy.
Mr. Joseph Yeung, Managing Director-MCAPL who conducted the Trade Minister around the facility, said processing of RCN locally has enormous economic advantages to growth of the economy, especially employment creation and revenue generation.
According to him, the value of annual processed cashew kernels (21% of 65,000mt) is estimated at US$102million as against US$56million expected to be generated from that same quantum of RCN when exported. He added that on average, it requires at least 200 personnel to process 1,000mt/year.
Mr. Yeung prayed for quick intervention to save the “agonising cashew processing industry”, which he indicated must be done before the next cashew season beginning 2016 in order to avert further imminent job-losses and protect its rich revenue generation element as well; adding, “Any intervention aimed at protecting the processing industry must also take famers’ interests into cognisance”.
MCAPL was established in 2008 with an initial processing capacity of 300mt/year, and it increased its capacity to 7,000mt in 2014. The management of the company had planned to move some of its jobs to the community where they buy RCN as a way of improving the income in those communities where employment opportunities are hard to come by, but the challenging business environment has shattered that dream.
Source: http://thebftonline.com/business/agribusiness/14616/Gov%E2%80%99t-keen-on-growing-cashew-sector.html

Ghana’s cashew potential estimated at $56 million annually

Date: 13-07-2015



Ghana’s annual revenue from exporting raw cashew nuts is estimated at 56 million dollars, Mr Joseph Yeung, Managing Director of the Mim Cashew Processing Company, has revealed.

He said value of processed cashew kernels, which is 21 per cent of the 65,000 metric tons of the annual raw cashew produced is also expected to earn the country 102 million dollars.
Mr Yeung, disclosed this when Dr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, Minister of Trade and Industry paid a working visit to the company’s plant site at Mim in the Asunafo North Municipality.
He explained Ghana has numerous opportunities from processing cashew nuts and advised the government implement policies that would make the industry attractive for rapid economic transformation and development.

Mr Yeung noted that prior to the border closure by Ivory Coast, the company was able to procure about 50 per cent of raw cashew nuts through Sampa, but now it is forced to purchase nuts from Burkina Faso at high cost and more risk.

He said the company is operating at 60 per cent of its installed capacity and employing more than 1,000 local staff, adding that if it is able to operate fully, the company would require additional 600 staff with a possible income to the community of no less than GH₵ 1,800,000.00.

Mr Yeung emphasised the need for the government to carry out immediate action to save the “agonising processing industry”, from shutting down, and this he said would be done before the next cashew season in 2016.

“Otherwise the processing industry will be doomed with a huge loss of jobs and revenue to Ghana”, he said.

Mr Yeung said that the current installed cashew processing capacity in the country stands at approximately 70,000 metric tons.

He said the only operational processing this year would only be 5,000 metric tons with 11 out of the 12 existing processors being closed down.

Dr Spio-Garbrah, advised the cashew processing companies to meet and come out with recommendations that would guide the government to design and implement policies to enhance the sector.

He commended the company for the job opportunity it has created for the local people, and assured management that government would ensure that the cashew industry is revived to create more jobs.

Source: http://www.myjoyonline.com/business/2015/July-13th/ghanas-cashew-potential-estimated-at-56-million-annually.php#sthash.WK1Mn0R7.dpuf

India: MP seeks reopening of cashew factories


Tue July 14, 2015



N.K. Premachandran, MP, has called upon the State government to take immediate steps to reopen the cashew factories under the management of the public sector Kerala State Cashew Development Corporation (KSCDC). In a statement here on Monday, Mr. Premachandran said that the KSCDC has all along been projected as a model employer in the cashew sector and the factories of such an establishment remaining closed indefinitely cannot in any way be justified.

He said that as per a government decision the minimum wages of cashew workers were recently hiked. KSDC factories should have been in the lead to implement the wage hike. It is true that there is an administrative crisis in the KSCDC. But keeping the factories closed till the crisis is solved does not augur well for a model employer, Mr. Premachandran added.

Thousands of cashew workers, a good majority of them women have been badly hit by the situation.

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/

Tanzania: 11 cashew nut processing companies in Ghana closed down

July 14, 2015



Eleven out of 12 local cashew nut processing companies have closed down because of stiff competition from foreign businesses.

The foreign businesses buy raw cashew nuts and export them, a development which has denied the local companies of raw cashew nuts to process.

This came to light when the Minister of Trade and Industry, Dr Ekow Spio-Garbrah paid a visit to the Mim Cashew and Agricultural Products Limited as part of his three-day tour of industrial establishments in the Brong Ahafo Region.

Source: http://www.gbcghana.com/1.5168801

Tanzania: Three cashew nut processing factories in offing

13th July 2015



 The government in collaboration with the Tanzania Cashew Nut Board (TCB) and Cashew Nut Industry Development Trust Fund (CIDTF) are in plans to construct three factories in three regions with the capacity of processing 30,000 tons of raw cashew nuts per year.

The move is aimed at making sure that Tanzania exports ready processed cashew nuts to countries like India and Vietnam which are the big buyers of the crop.Speaking in Kibaha, Coast Region over the week during a stakeholders’ meeting, TCB processing manager, Simuli Yahaya said the constructions of the factories were in early stages of completion whereby they had also paid for the land and were to acquire the tittle deeds.The meeting was aimed at giving feedback and a way forward in developing the cashew nut crop in the country.According to Yahaya, the factories will be completed as soon as a tender for the business plan and a consultant were found.He mentioned the regions where the factories will be constructed as Mtwara, Ruvuma (Tunduru) and Pwani (Mkuranga).

“We are expecting that upon the completion of the three factories will provide a  ready market for cashew nut farmers hence boosting   farmers efforts. We also want the crop to once again retain its quality and brand in the world market as it was in the previous years,” he said.He said it would also open doors to farmers who had dumped cashew nut farming to resume cultivation of the crop  since there will be a ready market permanent for the farmers.Yahaya stressed that they wanted to make Tanzania a major grower as it used to be in the past before the government privatised the factories.According to him, the leading cashew nut producers in Africa was Ivory Coast with the capacity to produce over 400, 000 tones followed by Guinea Bissau (300,000 tones) and Tanzania (200,000 tones).He however said that through their project, they were also expecting to distribute at least 10 million nursery plants in ten regions where the crop was grown.In his opening remarks, Evarist Ndikilo said that joint collaboration and efforts would again open doors to cashew nut farmers in the country and allow them to benefit from the crop production. “We have to look and work on the challenges facing the sector, farmers should be given a room to attend to such meetings so as to allow them to learn better ways of cultivation and processing the crop in a manner that they were sold easily in the international market,” he urged adding that it was time for farmers to benefit from the crop cultivation and production.

SOURCE: THE GUARDIAN

Tanzania: Cashew Nut Stakeholders Call for More Govt Support


Mon July 13, 2015



Cashew nut stakeholders in the country have asked the government to intensify support to industries processing the crop by addressing critical challenges. Cashewnut Board of Tanzania (CBT) Processing Manager, Simuli Yahaya speaking at a stakeholders' meeting here over the weekend, mentioned some of the challenges as shortage of processing equipment like boilers, driers, shelling and packaging machines.

"There is need for government to support us by facilitating processing activities in order to expand market for cashew nuts produced in Tanzania," he said. According to him, this will boost living standards of stakeholders and families in regions producing the products and eventually contributing to national income.

He also explained on the importance of training small scale processors in the country purposely to meet required technological standards. It was noted that the Cashew nut Industry Development Trust Fund (CIDT) organised a meeting aimed at brainstorming and digesting best practices that could enhance productivity of the sector, including ways to assist cashew processors to move out of traditional and old-fashioned processing methods.

Addressing the same conference, the Chairman of Southern Jumbo Cashew nuts Industry, Mr Maokola Majogo, advocated for cashew nut processing industries in Tanzania to have uniform way of processing as a way to stimulate the crop's performance on the world market.

"We want to meet international standards by having product seal that will expand our access to the international market," he said, adding that Tanzania is the third producer of cashew nut in Africa, led by Ivory Coast and Gambia. "This is one of the highly-paying crop, therefore, we need strategies to produce results expected from cashew sector," said Mr Majogo.

"We have to ensure that the crop is processed within the country before export so that local farmers can reap what they sowed, as a way to support farmers' efforts in continuing to grow and develop the crop," he added. According to him, this is a most urgent need to directly impact on the prices across the value chain and maximize gains from the crop by increasing local capacity to process as well as seeking other markets.

CIDT was introduced in 2010 under the Trustees Incorporation Act Number 318. It is composed by different members such as local government authorities, cashew nut farmers, processors, CBT and the central government.

Source: http://allafrica.com/stories/201507130202.html