Cashew Kernel Price Today

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Thứ Sáu, 29 tháng 4, 2016

India: Raw Cashew Bearish on Financial Trouble

30 April 2016

Buyers from Delhi are interested in premium W320 around Rs7500+TAX/11.340 kg/Goa-Mangalore. But there is no such buying interest in other markets.

In Kerala, even after 5% fall in prices bulk buyers are not interested in raw cashew. Selling price of raw cashew is now around Rs120+CST/165 Counts/6% Moisture.

Source: http://worldcashew.com/raw-cashew-bearish-on-financial-trouble/

India: Cashew exports plummet 20% in 2015-16


21 April 2016



Cashew shipments from the country slipped by 20 per cent in 2015-16 while imports of raw cashew nuts saw a substantial increase during the last fiscal year.

Total shipments stood at 94,150 tonnes, worth ₹4,850.39 crore, with a unit value of ₹515.17/kg against 1,18,820 tonnes, valued at ₹5,431.30 crore, at a unit value of ₹457.10.

Meanwhile, imports of raw cashew nuts rose to 9,49,322 tonnes worth ₹8,473.60 crore against 9,32,224 tonnes valued at ₹6,569.52 crore. The average unit value was at ₹89.26/kg in 2015-16 against ₹70.47 the previous fiscal.

Multiple factors
Attributing the fall in exports mainly to non-receipt of parity price for kernel, Sundaran Prabha, Chairman, Cashew Export Promotion Council of India (CEPCI), told BusinessLine that the high Raw Cashew Nut (RCN) prices, coupled with the closure of around 80 per cent of the factories in Kerala following a hike in wages, has also contributed to this phenomenon.

He said the increase in imports of raw nuts is because of trading in RCN in the country and shipping out for processing in Vietnam.

Meanwhile, imports of kernels have risen to 2,477 tonnes valued at ₹109.25 crore from 957 tonnes valued at ₹30.22 crore in 2014-15.

However, exports of Cashew Nut Shell Liquid and Cardanol have moved up last fiscal on low unit value to 11,447 tonnes valued at ₹55.96 crore from 10,938 tonnes valued at ₹55.81 crore. The unit value was at ₹48.88 a kg against ₹51.03 in 2014-15, CEPCI sources said.

According to trade sources, during the first week of April business was done for W240 at $3.90-4 and W320 at $3.70-3.80 per lb (FoB) for April, May and June shipments. Not much business was reported in other grades.

Last week, the price levels for W240 were $3.95-4.10; W320: $3.75-3.95; W450: $3.60-3.75; SW320: $3.50-3.65; Splits: $3.20-3.35; Pieces: $3.05-3.15 per lb (FoB).

“Even though there were more enquiries the activities were limited”, Pankaj N Sampat, a Mumbai-based dealer, told BusinessLine.

Rising again
RCN prices started moving down by end February, he said. With the introduction of import duty on RCN in India, people were expecting further softening. Surprisingly, RCN prices started moving up again from mid-March.

For instance, Ivory Coast (IVC) which has the largest crop in Africa and had gone below $1,300 a tonne has moved up to $1,500 — recording an increase of nearly 15 per cent in one month. Whereas, IVC RCN was traded in the range of $1,150-1,300 in 2015.

Following the increase in RCN prices, the kernel market, which has been steady for a very long time, started moving up. Prices have been going up by a few cents every week from mid-March. Due to the delay in crop arrivals and reduced buying by Indian processors, kernel availability will be reduced.

This expectation, coupled with some delays in February and March shipments from Vietnam, induced buyers from the US and EU to come in and pick up all offers for nearby shipments.

http://m.thehindubusinessline.com/economy/agri-business/cashew-exports-plummet-20-in-201516/article8505171.ece

Vietnam: Lacking raw materials, workshops (enterprises) halt operations

27 April 2016



Drought, saline intrusion and unmethodical business plans all have dealt a blow on enterprises, leaving them with a material shortage. 

Sugar refineries are the plants which first suffered from the material shortage. A series of refineries have halted operation. Chair of the Vietnam Sugar and Sugar Cane Association Nguyen Thanh Long confirmed that Kien Giang, Hiep Hoa, Ca Mau and Long My Phat have stopped running. According to Long, as the expected profit from sugar cane plantation is modest, farmers have chopped down sugarcane to grow other crops such as fruit trees and short-term crops. As the sugarcane output has decreased, sugar refineries lack materials. Refineries, while looking for materials to fulfill export contracts, have to collect sugar cane at high prices. As a result, they have to sell products at high prices, which cannot compete with cheap smuggled imports from Thailand.

Sugar refineries are the plants which first suffered from the material shortage. A series of refineries have halted operation.

The problem, plus the serious drought and saline intrusion, have worsened the refineries’ situation and forced them to halt production, or they would incur heavier losses. Tran Van Linh, general director of Thuan Phuoc Seafood & Trade JSC, said shrimp processing factories have lacked materials since the beginning of the year. The material supply can meet 30 percent of the production capacity. “We have refused some high-value contracts,” he said. “We now have to buy materials at high prices, but the supply is still short.” With the catfish output in 2016 predicted to decrease by 40 percent, the thirst for materials at catfish processing factories is foreseeable. “As catfish prices were too low, which could not ensure profit, farmers have given up farming,” secretary general of the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers (VASEP) Truong Dinh Hoe explained. It is now the high harvesting time, but the cashew nut supply is short because of prolonged drought. 

Chair of the Vietnam Cashew Association Nguyen Duc Thanh said cashew nut processing factories now run at 50 percent of capacity, while they would face serious material shortage in the upcoming months. Meanwhile, processors cannot get imports delivered. Contracts were signed with the partners from Ivory Coast and some other African countries, but partners have refused to deliver products, while raising prices. However, Long from the sugar association said while many enterprises are ‘half dead with hunger for materials’, others still can live well as they can control the material supply. TTC Group, for example, has the production cost at VND510,000 per ton, equal to that of Thailand, because it has been joining forces with farmers to develop sugar cane fields with the high yield of 90 tons per hectare.

PL TPHCM

Source: http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/business/155476/lacking-raw-materials--workshops-halt-operations.html

Guinea Bissau sets cashew farmgate price at 61 cents per kg

29 April 2016



BISSAU - Guinea Bissau has set the farmgate price to 350 CFA francs ($0.6067) per kg for cashews for the April-to-September commercial campaign, a 40 percent increase over the price last season.

Cashew is the main export crop for Guinea Bissau and aims to export at least 200,000 tonnes this season, up about 11 percent from 2015, Prime Minister Carlos Correia said at the launch of the cashew season.

Guinea-Bissau's main trading partner for its crop is India, itself a cashew producer, but it will enter the markets of China and Vietnam this season.

($1 = 576.9200 CFA francs) (Reporting by Alberto Dabo; writing by Makini Brice; editing by Matthew Mpoke Bigg and Jason Neely)

Source: http://af.reuters.com/article/guineaBissauNews/idAFL5N17N3GO

Ivory Coast cashew prices climb on demand, competition from smugglers


KORHOGO, Ivory Coast, April 29 (Reuters) - 



High global demand for cashews is pushing up prices in Ivory Coast, the world's leading producer of the nut, where local exporters are battling with smugglers for supplies, farmers and exporters said on Friday.

Ivory Coast, already the world's top cocoa producer, surpassed India for the first time last year as production leapt more than 24 percent over the previous season to 702,510 tonnes of nuts.

Cashews, a popular snack in Europe and North America, is an essential ingredient in Asian cooking and is increasingly used in products such as dairy-free ice cream.

In the northern city of Korhogo, a purchasing hub where dozens of new warehouses have opened in the past five years, buyers said there was intense competition for supplies.

"We're under pressure from our (exporter) clients," local buyer Meyeregue Soro said. "Unless you pay 500 CFA francs ($0.86) per kilogram, the farmers won't even look at you."

Ivory Coast's government set a minimum farmgate prices of 350 CFA francs per kg for the 2016 marketing season, up from 275 CFA francs last year. But buyers said they were paying between 500 and 550 CFA francs per kg to secure stocks. CAS-CIF-CI

An Abidjan-based exporter said the reasons for the rising prices were two-fold.

First, he said Ivorian output was expected to drop by as much as 20 percent this year due to weather conditions despite a forecast from the Cotton and Cashew Council, the national marketing board, that production would rise to 725,000 tonnes.  

But he said new taxes on exporters amounting to 45 CFA francs per kg were also fuelling smuggling as some traders sought to circumvent the new levy by shipping Ivorian cashews via other regional ports.

"The smuggling is continuing," the exporter said. "(The government) has been able to constrict the flow into Ghana, but now it's going into Burkina Faso. They're shipping out of Accra (Ghana) and Lome (Togo)."

He said he expected to see around 40,000 tonnes of nuts illegally exported this season.

The taxes do not apply to companies with local processing facilities.

The trafficking was confirmed by local buyers in northern Ivory Coast, the West African nation's cashew-growing heartland.

"We are aware that there is contraband towards the border with Burkina Faso where some people are sending cashews on moto-tricycles," said Korhogo-based buyer Abdoulaye Cisse as workers dried nuts in front of his warehouse.

"We are hearing that sellers over there are earning 100 CFA francs (per kg) more than here," he added.

Just a decade ago, Ivory Coast was a middling cashew producer, growing around 80,000 tonnes of raw nuts per year.


But with output growing by an average of over 10 percent annually, the sector has attracted thousands of farmers in the impoverished north where many have abandoned cotton, the area's traditional cash crop, in favour of cashews.

In the village of Sohouo, some 15 km from Korhogo, most local farmers now grow cashews.

"The lives of farmers have changed a lot here in the village these last three years because cashews pay well," said Lacina Silue, standing front of a small, neat house with a satellite dish on the roof.

"All my children go to school now with no problem. Growing cashews is even less physically tiring. We think lots of farmers will switch from cotton."


($1 = 578.8000 CFA francs) (Additional reporting and editing by Joe Bavier, editing by David Evans)

By Loucoumane Coulibaly

Source: http://af.reuters.com/article/commoditiesNews/idAFL5N17V3H3

Cote d'Ivoire: Global demand and smuggling push cashew prices

29 April 2016



High global demand for cashews is pushing up prices in Ivory Coast, the world's leading producer of the nut, where local exporters are battling with smugglers for supplies, farmers and exporters said on Friday.

Ivory Coast, already the world's top cocoa producer, surpassed India for the first time last year as production leapt more than 24 percent over the previous season to 702,510 tonnes of nuts. Cashews, a popular snack in Europe and North America, is an essential ingredient in Asian cooking and is increasingly used in products such as dairy-free ice cream.

The smuggling is continuing

In the northern city of Korhogo, a purchasing hub where dozens of new warehouses have opened in the past five years, buyers said there was intense competition for supplies. "We're under pressure from our (exporter) clients," local buyer Meyeregue Soro said. "Unless you pay 500 CFA francs ($0.86) per kilogram, the farmers won't even look at you."

Ivory Coast's government set a minimum farmgate prices of 350 CFA francs per kg for the 2016 marketing season, up from 275 CFA francs last year. But buyers said they were paying between 500 and 550 CFA francs per kg to secure stocks.

An Abidjan-based exporter said the reasons for the rising prices were two-fold. First, he said Ivorian output was expected to drop by as much as 20 percent this year due to weather conditions despite a forecast from the Cotton and Cashew Council, the national marketing board, that production would rise to 725,000 tonnes.

But he said new taxes on exporters amounting to 45 CFA francs per kg were also fuelling smuggling as some traders sought to circumvent the new levy by shipping Ivorian cashews via other regional ports.

"The smuggling is continuing," the exporter said. "(The government) has been able to constrict the flow into Ghana, but now it's going into Burkina Faso. They're shipping out of Accra (Ghana) and Lome (Togo)." He said he expected to see around 40,000 tonnes of nuts illegally exported this season.

The taxes do not apply to companies with local processing facilities. The trafficking was confirmed by local buyers in northern Ivory Coast, the West African nation's cashew-growing heartland.

"We are aware that there is contraband towards the border with Burkina Faso where some people are sending cashews on moto-tricycles," said Korhogo-based buyer Abdoulaye Cisse as workers dried nuts in front of his warehouse. "We are hearing that sellers over there are earning 100 CFA francs (per kg) more than here," he added.

Just a decade ago, Ivory Coast was a middling cashew producer, growing around 80,000 tonnes of raw nuts per year. But with output growing by an average of over 10 percent annually, the sector has attracted thousands of farmers in the impoverished north where many have abandoned cotton, the area's traditional cash crop, in favour of cashews.

In the village of Sohouo, some 15 km from Korhogo, most local farmers now grow cashews. "The lives of farmers have changed a lot here in the village these last three years because cashews pay well," said Lacina Silue, standing front of a small, neat house with a satellite dish on the roof. "All my children go to school now with no problem. Growing cashews is even less physically tiring. We think lots of farmers will switch from cotton." 

Source: http://www.theafricareport.com/West-Africa/cote-divoire-global-demand-and-smuggling-push-cashew-prices.html

US Embassy Singapore Honors East Bali Cashews for Corporate Excellence


Fri Apr 29, 2016


The US Embassy in Singapore has honored East Bali Cashews (“EBC”) for its outstanding societal impact following EBC’s win of the 2015 US Secretary of State’s Award for Corporate Excellence (“ACE”). EBC received that award during a ceremony at the US Department of State in Washington DC earlier this year.

“It is easy to find value in good cashews, but it takes real vision and concern for others to do what East Bali Cashews has done to uplift an entire community,” said Blair P. Hall, Jr., Deputy Chief of Mission at the US Embassy in Singapore. “Secretary Kerry chose to honor EBC and its founder, Aaron Fishman, because his business has been transformative. EBC now employs over 350 people in Bali, including previously unemployed women, while building a preschool for employees' children and increasing incomes of local farmers by 20 percent along the way.”

Since 1999, the Secretary of State awards the ACE each year to recognize companies that are leaders in responsible business conduct worldwide and make important contributions to the growth and sustainable development of the local economies in which they operate.

“Aaron embodies the best of American social entrepreneurialism and the can-do attitude of US entrepreneurs, who look at a problem and see solutions, not impediments, and who look at a business relationship as an investment for the long-term, not a transaction for the short term,” Mr. Hall continued. “Aaron did not do it alone. Pro-bono assistance from US investment firm KKR in partnership with Impact Investment Exchange (IIX) gave him the business tools he needed and provided another showcase for something Americans and American businesses do so well – Corporate Social Responsibility, in which the United States is a global leader.”

During the honor ceremony located at the residence of the Deputy Chief of Mission, Founder and CEO of EBC Aaron Fishman discussed the business and its community empowerment philosophy.

“It has been a true honor to receive the Secretary of State’s award,” said EBC Founder and CEO Aaron Fishman. “The ACE underscores our efforts to enhance the lives of people in the village of Desa Ban, Karangasem, East Bali, by creating new jobs, offering social services and equipping people to rise out of poverty.”

EBC uses sustainable, eco-friendly business practices to process unshelled cashews, package and sell them to the domestic and international markets. The company is based in Desa Ban, creating employment opportunities where per capita income is US$2 per day.

During its initial stages, global investment firm KKR offered its expertise by helping develop EBC’s financial model and business plan.

“East Bali Cashews creates social value in a local Indonesian community as part of its business model,” said Kabir Mathur, Director at KKR Southeast Asia and a member of KKR’s capacity building impact investment team. “KKR is extremely proud of the work East Bali Cashews has done and for being part of its journey.”

“Without KKR’s support and guidance, we would never have raised the capital at the pace we have done so. They completely accelerated our growth,” added Mr. Fishman.

In presenting the award, the State Department noted how EBC has improved the quality of local agricultural production, modernized its methods and expanded services to address the health and education needs of the children of company employees.

Company Readies Launch of East Bali Center for Community Development

As EBC has become more embedded within the Ban community, they have come to understand not only the depth of need in the region, but how to successfully implement social programming to catalyze sustainable change.

In order to leverage EBC’s community relationships and expand their social impact, EBC is launching a venture philanthropy initiative, the East Bali Center for Community Development (EBCCD).

The EBCCD is raising contributions to fund programs that will generate community empowerment through farmer education. Providing farmers with the knowledge on best practices for crops can best raise the living standards in Desa Ban.

The EBCCD will also contain a lodge which will be a service-learning provider, offering social, environmental and cross-cultural learning adventures aimed at international school groups.

“EBC has been visionary in building a profitable business that simultaneously generates a powerful social impact. EBC’s creating a new model of social entrepreneurship based on venture philanthropy to find new ways to impact the lives of its community is an exciting development,” said Steven R. Okun, Director of Public Affairs at KKR Asia Pacific, who serves as an advisor to the EBCCD.

About East Bali Cashews

We're nuts about cashews. Our top-quality local, fresh and natural cashews are gluten-free and vegan with zero cholesterol. When you eat them, you are enjoying more than a healthy superfood. You are helping improve the social, economic and agricultural conditions of our home, Desa Ban, Indonesia, a village in the mountains of East Bali, a region suffering from staggering poverty, lack of education and unforgiving terrain.

We are a young, energetic company who are revolutionizing the cashew trade by doing things differently. We built our factory in a central location with one purpose: to provide you with the freshest, most ethically sourced cashews possible while lifting up our community. We buy directly from local small-holder farmers and process the cashews in the village where they are grown before shipping them off for you to enjoy. We educate and empower farmers and their families, produce our own energy using cashew shell biomass, and we're launching new initiatives all the time to find new ways to grow together. We now employ 350 people in the region, 85% of whom are women who had few to no opportunities before we opened our doors.

Sustainability in all its forms and community empowerment is fundamental to our philosophy. Our commitment to a triple bottom line means that people and planet come first, and profit sustains and supports each. Together with our Ban family, we've worked hard to make it so that when you choose East Bali Cashews, you are receiving the highest quality, freshest cashews, made with natural ingredients and pure love. No Preservatives. No artificial ingredients. No BS. Just what we think are the best cashews in the world.

For additional information, please visit East Bali Cashews’ website at www.eastbalicashews.com.

Contacts

East Bali Cashews
Jonas Preisler (English)
jonas@eastbalicashews.com
or
Tria Dinanti (Indonesian)

Source: http://www.businesswire.com/

USA: Despite drought, California almond acreage rose 6 percent in 2015

April 28 2016



SACRAMENTO — The drought has done little to slow the growth of almond acreage in California, as the more than 1.1 million overall acres planted in 2015 was 6 percent more than the previous year.

Of last year’s total plantings, 890,000 acres were bearing and 220,000 acres were non-bearing, and preliminary bearing acreage for this year is estimated at 900,000 acres, the National Agricultural Statistics Service reports.The increase came despite removals of about 45,000 acres of trees in 2015 — much of which occurred after harvest — and continues a trend in which acreage has doubled in the last 20 years, according to government and industry statistics.However, the Almond Board of California downplays the trend’s impact on water resources, citing studies that found most new acreage has replaced other irrigated crops and the total amount of water used by agriculture has held steady since 2000.“Almonds take up about 14 percent of the state’s irrigated farmland but use 9.5 percent of California’s agricultural water — less than a proportionate share,” board president and chief executive officer Richard Waycott said in a statement. “Because of the industry’s commitment to research and efficiency, growers use 33 percent less water to grow a pound of almonds than they did two decades ago.”

As lucrative prices have continued to encourage growers to switch to nuts from other crops, the almond board has fought diligently in the past couple of years to rebut critics who charge the industry places too much of a burden on the environment. Last summer, the board set aside $2.5 million in research into water efficiency, honeybee health and best practices for the current fiscal year.The board argues that almond trees provide certain benefits to the environment, including groundwater recharge potential and carbon sequestration.Even as drastic cutbacks in surface water during the drought have prompted some growers in the San Joaquin Valley to remove trees, Kern, Fresno, Stanislaus, Merced and Madera counties still led the state in 2015 in terms of acreage, combining for 73 percent of California’s bearing orchards, according to NASS.Nonpareils continued to be the leading variety with 310,646 total acres in 2015, followed by Monterey (102,299), Butte (86,152), Carmel (81,449) and Padre (55,493), the agency reported.The estimates were based on a voluntary survey sent to about 6,000 almond growers as well as almond nursery sales and pesticide application data maintained by county agricultural commissioners and the state Department of Pesticide Regulation, NASS explained.

Source: http://www.capitalpress.com

India: Raw Cashew Bearish on Financial Trouble


Thu Apr 28, 2016




Buyers from Delhi are interested in premium W320 around Rs7500+TAX/11.340 kg/Goa-Mangalore. But there is no such buying interest in other markets.

In Kerala, even after 5% fall in prices bulk buyers are not interested in raw cashew. Selling price of raw cashew is now around Rs120+CST/165 Counts/6% Moisture.

Source: http://worldcashew.com/

India: Goa's Feni to sport 'Heritage Spirit' tag


Thu Apr 28, 2016


Goa's Feni is all set to go places as the state government gets ready to amend the four-decade old Excise Act to give the traditional brew a 'Heritage Spirit' tag.

The state government will move an amendment to the Goa Excise Duty Act, 1964, which will save Feni from being tagged as country liquor and instead would be classified as Heritage Spirit, Commissioner of Excise, Goa, Menino D'Souza said. The amendment is likely to be moved during the upcoming monsoon session of the Goa Assembly scheduled for July. The move is expected to open up markets for Feni across the country. The Feni distilling industry has been demanding removal of the country liquor tag as the brew has already won the Geographical Indication recognition.

Goa Chief Minister Laxmikant Parsekar recently announced the decision to accord Feni the status of a Heritage Spirit. We want to place Feni alongside tequila and scotch, which was once the country liquor, D'Souza added. Feni marketing has hit a roadblock due to the country liquor label as its sale is not allowed in any other state except Daman.


Source: http://sakshipost.com/

Tanzania: Analysis Done to Identify, Cure Cashew Nut Disease in Coast


Tue Apr 26, 2016




THE government unveiled before the National Assembly here measures taken so far to contain diseases that affect cashew nuts in Coastal Region, Mkuranga District in particular.

Deputy Minister for Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries Development, Mr William Ole Nasha, said that after learning about the disease in the areas, the ministry directed experts to analyse and identify the source, preventive measures and treatment.

After the analysis, he said, it was discovered that the disease was caused by fungus of Fussarium wilt type. He disclosed that currently the ministry's Naliendele Research Institute was going on with tests for the disease cure.

The deputy minister was answering a question by Abdallah Ulenga (Mkuranga-CCM) who wanted to know the measures the government was taking to compensate the citizens from Magawa and Msonga Wards in Makumbaya, Magawa and Msonga Villages.

According to the MP, about 1000-acres of cashew nuts from the said villages have been affected by the disease, leaving the citizens with nothing.

He, therefore, requested the government to consider compensating the villagers as had been done to others with similar disaster.

In his response, the deputy minister said that the available means of assisting farmers as per the government procedure was to distribute crop seedlings to the affected areas after getting the actual need from the district council.

By Ashery Mkama

Source: http://allafrica.com/stories/201604270107.html

Thứ Ba, 26 tháng 4, 2016

Nigerian-US university partnership for mango, cashew processing


April 25, 2016



In Ogbomoso, Nigeria, large quantities of mango and cashew nuts are produced. Now the Ladoke Akintola University of Technology based there, has signed a memorandum of understanding with the University of Wisconsin-Stout to process the fruits. The vice chancellor of LAUTECH, Prof. Adeniyi Gbadegesin, said the university decided to find a way to preserve the fruits which were seasonal in order to add value to them.

He said, ”We recognise that mangoes are in season now but a large number of them perish, as do cashews and we have to do something to add value to them.”  Prof. Femi Adekola, who is the Dean of College of Management, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA and others from the same university are in Nigeria to discuss how to add value to these fruits.

Source: punchng.com

Ghana: Resident withdraws policy banning export of raw cashew


Mon Apr 25, 2016



President John Dramani Mahama has announced the outright withdrawal of the policy banning the export of raw cashew, and outlined other measures to boost the emerging industry.

At a meeting with representatives of cashew farmers in the Brong Ahafo Region at the Flagstaff House yesterday, the President also said the government would also establish a Cashew Marketing Board to regulate the cashew industry.

The Ministry of Trade and Industry, which introduced the controversial policy, explained that it was part of measures to boost the local processing of cashew and subsequently create jobs for the people.

The minister later suspended it after cashew farmers in the Brong Ahafo Region and buyers voiced their concerns over the policy, which they said was counter-productive.

A press statement issued by the sector minister, Mr Ekwow Spio-Garbrah, announcing the withdrawal, said in part, "The ministry wishes to temporarily withdraw the administrative directive for the exportation of raw cashew nuts to allow for consultations with stakeholders to ensure that the cashew industry becomes competitive in a broad-based manner that would lead to job creation and the general well-being of all stakeholders."

Farmers complain

According to the buyers, the local processing companies could process just 35,000 bags out of the about 950,000 bags produced in the country annually, meaning the huge chunk of the produce would go waste.

The farmers also maintained that the ban negatively affected their investment as the only two local processing companies quoted low prices for the nuts.

Although there are 12 cashew processing plants in the country, only two are said to be functioning. They are Mim Cashew and Agricultural Products Limited, and Usibra Limited.

Meeting

The cashew farmers, therefore, sought a meeting with the President through the Brong Ahafo Regional Minister, Mr Eric Opoku, to put their case across.

About 50 farmers drawn from Jaman South, Techiman South, Banda, Tain, Wenchi, Jaman North and Techiman North attended the meeting.

They were led by the Omanhene of Suma Ahenkro, Nana Dr Afram Brempong III.

Putting the case of the farmers before the President, Nana Dr Brempong said cashew production had become the livelihood of many people in the Brong Ahafo Region and for that reason the ban was going to impoverish them.

He said following the ban the price of a bag of raw cashew nuts slumped from GHC4.50 to GHC2.

Nana Dr Brempong Afram also appealed to the President to consider the creation of a national marketing board to oversee the growth of the industry

Response

Responding, the President said the withdrawal would be followed by consultations with stakeholders in the industry to see how to move the local processing of the nuts forward.

He said the processing of the nuts was necessary to inject fresh life into the industry.

President Mahama added that the nation could not rely only on cocoa for foreign exchange and that was why the government attached seriousness to the diversification of crop farming.

By: Kwame Asare Boadu

Source: http://www.businessghana.com

Thứ Hai, 25 tháng 4, 2016

INC: Can nuts help to improve semen quality?


The INC has granted a new research about the effect of nut consumption (walnuts, almonds and hazelnuts) on semen quality and functionality. 

Nuts have nutrients as arginine, zinc, folate, vitamins C and E, which have been related to male fertility.



April 19th 2016.- Many physiological, environmental, and genetic factors, including oxidative stress, have been implicated to semen quality[i] but tree nuts have been related through history as a symbol of procreation and fertility[ii]. In fact, some studies have revealed the relation between nut consumption and erectile function. Researchers from the University of California described a beneficial effect of chronic nut consumption on semen quality. They demonstrated that walnuts added to a Western-style diet improved sperm quality, motility and morphology[iii]. Also, a recent study has demonstrated that pistachio consumption improves erectile function, probably because it contains, as other nuts, several antioxidants and arginine.[iv]

Actually, nuts contain several nutrients that have been associated to sperm quality and functionality. For instance, L-arginine, present at most of nuts, has been demonstrated to improve sperm concentration and motiliy[v],[vi],[vii]. Also, zinc, folate and Vitamins C and E have antioxidant properties, believed to be important to male fertility[viii],[ix],[x],[xi],[xii], and high folate intake has been associated with lower sperm aneuploidy8, which is the presence of an abnormal number of chromosomes and a common cause of genetic disorders in offsprings.

In this context, the INC (International Nut & Dried Fruit Council) has co-founded a new study that will be conducted in the next two years by the Human Nutrition Unit of Rovira i Virgili University in collaboration with the Cell Biology Unit of the Autonomous University of Barcelona. This research analyzes the semen of one hundred volunteers and will study conventional qualitative parameters, such as morphology, motility or vitality, and quantitative aspects, such as sperm concentration and semen volume. “We want to analyse whether consumption of nuts for 14 weeks in the context of an unhealthy diet can improve the quality of semen and its functionality”, explains Dr. Mònica Bulló, head researcher. “We will look at different parameters at DNA and RNA level, going further than other studies”, adds Dr. Bulló. 

About the International Nut & Dried Fruit Council

INC members include nearly 700 nut and dried fruit-sector companies from over 70 countries. INC is the international organization of reference regarding health, nutrition, statistics, food safety, international standards and regulations relating to nuts and dried fruit.




[i] Auger J, Eustache F, Andersen AG, Irvine DS, Jørgensen N, Skakkebæk NE, Suominen J, Toppari J, Vierula M, Jouannet P. Sperm morphological defects related to environment , lifestyle and medical history of 1001 male partners of pregnant women from four European cities. Hum Reprod 2001;16:2710-2717.
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Ghana: Ministry to address cashew processors’ liquidity problems

Mon Apr 25, 2016




The ministry of Trade and Industry is working to address liquidity challenges facing local cashew processing companies to ensure prompt payment to cashew farmers.

The sector minister, Mr Ekwow Spio Garbrah, who said this, noted that there was the need to adequately address liquidity challenges that had plagued local processors by exploring avenues for credit facilities to enable them to pay farmers on time for the supply of cashew.

“We are considering many options, including the establishment of a Cashew Development Board, to serve as a regulatory agency for cashew production and export in the country,” Mr Garbrah said.

He indicated that the creation of a board or council would also ensure the availability of buffer stock at all times for local processors.

Mr Garbrah said this at a meeting with members of the ECOWAS Community Development Programme (ECOWAS CDP) Media Network in Accra last week.

The CDP Media Network, under the ECOWAS Vision 2020 project, is aimed at educating citizens across the region on the sub-regional integration policies and programmes.

According to the minister, if the ban on exportation of cashew was enforced in the future, there would be a minimum guaranteed price at which farmers could sell their produce to avoid losses.

“The advantage of having a development council or board in place would ensure that should a ban on the exportation of the commodity come into existence, domestic processors would always have money to pay farmers,” Mr Garbrah said.

The ministry’s administrative ban on the exportation of the commodity on March 14, 2016, on what officials said was an attempt to protect the local processing sector, was lifted after producers and Members of Parliament (MPs) opposed the move.

The minister, however, admitted that the ministry erred by announcing the ban when the relevant stakeholders were not involved in the consultative processes on the need to place a moratorium on the exportation of the commodity.

According to him, building blocks on credit facility, timeliness of payment by processors to farmers among other pertinent measures were not in place when the ban was announced.

“We were dealing with the leadership of the cashew industry and with all due respect, we didn’t deal with the people on the ground who are the most affected. We should have held durbars with farmers and even conduct demonstrations at the farm levels, which we failed to do prior to the announcement of the ban,” Mr Garbrah said.

“We are learning our lessons and we are ready to make progress, and I am certain the ban will definitely come to pass in the next three years, whether under my tenure as minister or whoever would succeed me”, he added.

Mr Garbrah hinted that although the policy to ban was a good one which aimed to support the growth of the local processing sector, “If we take a decision and certain groups feel enough public education was not done, we cannot enforce it when we have not officially sensitised the beneficiaries.”

The minister was of the view that the 13 processing companies in the country have the needed capacity to produce some 70,000 metric tons of cashew although the country’s production capacity presently stood at 60,000 metric tons annually.

Source: http://www.ghanaweb.com/