Cashew Kernel Price Today

Cashew Kernel Price Today...

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Chủ Nhật, 31 tháng 7, 2016

India: Cashew rises as demand picks up

NEW DELHI, July 30:  



Cashew prices rose by Rs 10 per kg in the national capital today largely on the back of increased buying by retailers and stockists on rising demand from bulk consumers.

Further, tight stocks following fall in supplies from growing regions also supported the uptrend.


Cashew kernel No 180, No 210, No 240 and No 320 rose by Rs 5 each to settle at Rs 935-960, Rs 850-860 Rs 770-785 and Rs 710-735 per kg, respectively.


Marketmen said increased buying by retailers and stockists against restricted supplies from growing belts, mainly pushed up cashew prices to rise.


Following are today’s quotations (per 40 kgs):


Almond (California) Rs 16,800-17,000, Almond(Gurbandi- new) Rs 11,200-11,600, Almond (Girdhi) Rs 5,400-5,600; Abjosh Afghani Rs 5,000-22,000.

Almond Kernel (California-new) Rs 590-600 per kg, Almond Kernel (Gurbandi-new) Rs 725-825 per kg. (PTI)

Source: http://www.dailyexcelsior.com/cashew-rises-as-demand-picks-up/

Cashew buyers move to cover from Vietnam


Wed July 27, 2016




Vietnam’s domestic and export markets on cashew kernels were very active over the last week, the Vietnam Cashew Association (VINACAS) reported.

VINACAS said that prices had increased by five-10 cents per lb from those of the previous week.

Dutch company Amberwood Trading (Rotterdam) said that purchasing demands from China, the US, and EU have been increased in the third quarter as international...

Read more: https://www.agra-net.com/agra/foodnews/dfn/nuts/cashews/cashew-buyers-move-to-cover-from-vietnam-522238.htm

Thứ Sáu, 29 tháng 7, 2016

India: Package sought for cashew sector

29 July 2016

KOLLAM: THE ailing cashew sector, mired in corruption and crisis in procuring raw cashew nuts, is back on revival path, it seems.

Bringing cheers to the sector, Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan on Friday demanded a special package for the sector from the Central Government.

As per his demand, presented before Prime Minister Narendra Modi, the cashew sector is in need of ‘a revamping and restructuring package’ and had proposed a package in lines with the Centre’s just declared ‘special package for employment generation and promotion of exports in textile and apparel sector’. J Mercy Kutty Amma, the minister who handles the Cashew portfolio, said that it was a suggestion put forwarded by the owners of private cashew companies.  “Earlier, the Chief Minister had held meeting with various stakeholders from cashew sector. In this meeting owners of private cashew companies requested Pinarayi to present a special package for the cashew sector before the PM,” she said. The state also has plans to set up a Cashew Board. “Though proposals in this regard were submitted to the Centre by the successive governments they get stonewalled. If the Centre rejects this time also, we will establish it on our own. A decision will be taken after Pinarayi returns from Delhi,” said  Mercy Kutty.  As the state is finding it difficult to procure raw cashew nuts, the state government is taking serious efforts to promote cashew cultivation. As a result, the government might consider the viability in converting the 4,000 hectares belonging to Hindustan Newsprint Ltd at Punalur for cashew cultivation.
If the Centre comes out with a special package for cashew like that of Textile Industry then it might be a major booster for the ailing industry as the package might generate employment and boost exports.

It was on June 22 that the Central Cabinet approved a special package for employment generation and promotion of exports in textile sector. As per the decision, ‘the package will lead to a cumulative increase of $30 billion in exports and investment of `74,000 crores over the next three years.

Source: http://www.newindianexpress.com/states/kerala/Package-sought-for-cashew-sector/2016/07/30/article3553872.ece

Thứ Tư, 27 tháng 7, 2016

Cashew market ‘like moving on thin ice’

Tue July 26, 2016




This is the view of Dutch company Global Trading & Agency, which notes that the cashew nut kernel market remains unstable.

“The remarks made in our last report are becoming more and more clear. Crop issues on quantity and quality are causing difficulties, ‘forcing’ some processors to deliver close to (or just over) the limits of the specifications. We heard rumours as well...

Read more: https://www.agra-net.com/agra/public-ledger/commodities/nuts/cashews/cashew-market-like-moving-on-thin-ice-522086.htm

Thứ Ba, 26 tháng 7, 2016

India: Quality issues compound cashew trading challenges

26 July 2016



The European cashew market is showing very little activity because most buyers in Europe are in holiday mood or are actually on holiday, Aldebaran Commodities observed in a market report.

However, the company added that in contrast to this slowdown in Europe, many believe the market has increased again between USD 0.05 and USD 0.10 per lb.

Read more: https://www.agra-net.com/agra/public-ledger/commodities/nuts/cashews/quality-issues-compound-cashew-trading-challenges-521930.htm

India: Branded cashew may get costlier due to rise in prices of imported raw nuts

22 July 2016



KOCHI: Branded cashew nut sellers may be forced to raise prices soon due to the continued increase in prices of imported raw nuts. 

Retail cashew prices have risen about 15% to more than Rs 700 per kg in recent days, but traders said a further revision is likely in the prices of the nut which has become a popular gift item and an essential ingredient of sweet dishes and cookies. 

"High prices and import duty have led to an increase in local prices even as demand has started to pick up with the festival season approaching. The local demand is more for cashew brokens," said G Sateesh Nair, managing director at India Food Exports, which sells the popular Delinuts. To prevent the misuse of free import norms, the government had slapped an import duty of 9.36% in March. As a result of the high price and duty, import of raw nuts into the country plummeted to less than half in the first two months of the current fiscal compared to that of a year ago. India meets more than 60% of its raw nut demand through imports, which touched a record 9.39 lakh tonnes last year. 

The shortage in supply has also led to the closure of many processing factories. 

"The cashew season in East Africa and Indonesia will start soon and the prices may hover around $1,750-1,800 per tonne which could put further pressure on supply. Already 35% of the cashew processing factories in India have downed their shutters with nut shortage," said K Prakash Rao, managing partner at Kalbavi Cashews. 

Exporters said the export obligations for free import are hard to follow. Besides, they said, the current price for cashew kernel doesn't match the high raw nut price.

Source: http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/markets/commodities/branded-cashew-may-get-costlier-due-to-rise-in-prices-of-imported-raw-nuts/articleshow/53329216.cms

India: CASHEW UNITS - KERALA

26 July 2016



CPI(M) leader V.S. Achuthanandan has demanded that the government make cashew factories functional before Onam. Mr. Achuthanandan said in a statement here on Saturday that the factories were the soles source of subsistence for about one-lakh workers. Unless the factories start functioning before Onam, they would not get any benefit before the festival season. The government was committed to help the workers living in penury, he said. — Special Correspondent

Source: http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-kerala/cashew-units/article8893231.ece

Vietnam's farm exports to hit 17.8 bln USD in first 7 months

HANOI, July 26 



Vietnam's farm export revenue is expected to hit 17.8 billion U.S. dollars in the first seven months of 2016, up 5.1 percent year-on-year, according to the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) on Tuesday.

During seven-month period, the country is forecast to sell 2.93 million tons of rice to world market, earning 1.32 billion U.S. dollars, down 18.4 percent in volume and 14.4 percent in value year-on-year, said the ministry in its monthly statistics report.

China continued to top Vietnam's rice exporting markets, accounting for over 35 percent of the market share, followed by Indonesia with 11.6 percent.

Markets witnessing high growth of rice exports include Ghana (up 41 percent year-on-year) and Ivory Coast (31.3 percent).

Besides, downward trend has been seen in several markets including the Philippines (down 54.3 percent year-on-year), Malaysia (59.2 percent) and Singapore (34.6 percent).

Meanwhile, the country is estimated to earn 988 million U.S. dollars from exporting 122,000 tons of pepper, up over 9 percent in value and 26 percent in volume.

Average Vietnam's pepper export price went down some 13 percent compared to the same period last year.

The same happens to average coffee export price, with a drop of 15.6 percent year-on-year.

However, the item sees an increase of 38 percent in export volume and 18 percent in export value.

During the seven-month period, the country pockets 1.98 billion U.S. dollars from exports of 1.13 million tons of coffee.

Concerning rubber exports, Vietnam is likely to export 564,000 tons of rubber worth 705 million U.S. dollars, up 8.8 percent in volume but down 7 percent in value year-on-year.

Similarly, in January-July period, Vietnam exports 69,000 tons of tea worth 110 million U.S. dollars, up 8.8 percent in volume and down 2.1 percent in value year-on-year.

Meanwhile, cashew nut witnesses growth in both export revenue and volume. The country is projected to ship 189,000 tons of cashew nuts to earn 1.46 billion U.S. dollars, up 2.5 percent in volume and 9 percent in value year-on-year.

In the first seven months, Vietnam earns 3.65 billion U.S. dollars from seafood exports, up 3.3 percent year-on-year.

The United States, China and Japan are major consumers of Vietnamese seafood, wood and wood products in Vietnam, said MARD.

Source: http://www.shanghaidaily.com/article/article_xinhua.aspx?id=331604

Chủ Nhật, 24 tháng 7, 2016

Nigeria’s cashew nut production to increase by 30 per cent



July 23, 2016



Nigeria is expected to record increase in its cashew nut production in coming years due to renewed focus by the government and increasing demand for the commodity across developed countries and Asia.The Chief Executive Officer of the Nigeria Export Promotion Council, Mr. Segun Awolowo, stated this during a recent workshop on cashew processing and market information system in Lagos.According to Awolowo, cashew is expected to yield 175,000 metric tonnes at the end of this year’s trading season, up from a yield of 150,000 metric tonnes in 2015.He added that recent government’s efforts in the development of additional cashew plantations, distribution of improved seedlings to farmers; enforced good agricultural practices were all going to increase output of cashew nuts in Nigeria by 30 per cent in two years.

Nigeria is rated as the fourth largest producer of cashew nuts in Africa and seventh in the world, with the bulk of its raw cashew nuts and cashew kernels exported to Vietnam and India, respectively.According to the NEPC CEO in 2011, Vietnam imported over $140m worth of RCN and $46m worth of cashew kernel from Nigeria, adding that in recent years, export of Nigeria RCN had been increasing.He said, “With a projected output of 175,000 metric tonnes of RCN in the just-concluded 2016 trading season, Nigeria is expected to earn over $200m at an average price of $1,200 per tonne in the international market.“Working with the USAID|Nigeria Expanded Trade and Transport project, the council has developed a cashew sector strategy for the cashew value chain in Nigeria. The cashew strategy is expected to improve the quality of Nigeria’s RCN and enhance the transparency of the Nigerian cashew industry by developing a Market Information System.

“Other measures put in place by the Federal Government to improve Nigeria’s export of RCN include enforcement of good agricultural practices at farmers’ field, setting up of up-country warehouses and drying centres in production areas to ensure strict compliance with moisture content as quality requirements and establishment of the Nigeria Commodity Exchange market for transparent trading system.”The workshop, which was organised by the African Cashew Alliance, USAID West Africa Trade and Investment Hub and USAID/NEXTT Project, unveiled the Cashew Marketing Information System that was developed by ACA to reflect reference pricing for cashew traders and market analysts.

The Managing Director of ACA, Dr. Babafemi Oyewole, stated that the MIS would address essential skills and knowledge needed to interpret and understand the global cashew market by enabling direct negotiations between buyers and sellers.“Being able to predict and interpret market trends is crucial to long-term business sustainability,” he added.The Accra-based ACA has over a decade, sought to improve the competiveness and sustainability of African cashew industry and increase the processing of cashew on the continent, hoping to increase processing from the current 15 per cent to 30 per cent in the next five years.“Ultimately, our objective is to facilitate the development of an industry that benefits the entire value chain, from farmer to consumer” Oyewole stated.

Source: https://www.today.ng

India: Cashew prices shoot up due to lack of labour

Jul 22, 2016



Visakhapatnam: High export demand as well as rising labour costs are the two primary reasons for the dramatic three fold rise in prices of cashew (with kernel) in the past 10 years.Between 2010 and 2013, the prices hovered between Rs 3,000 for an 88 kg bag to Rs 4,000 per bag. In 2013-14, the prices were static at Rs 4,000 a bag. After cyclone Hudhud, the prices went up to Rs 8,000 per bag. This year, the prices have touched Rs 9,000 per bag.

Cultivated on about 1,00,000 acres, cashew is produced to the tune of 6,00,000 bags of cashew with kernel per annum. Of this, 1.15 lakh is only cashewnut bags, ie 1,800 tonnes of cashewnuts per annum.However, traders say the actual production does not match these figures as most of the crop goes waste due to lack of labourers during the peak season. According to K Ram Murthy, who procures cashew and exports it to Palasa in Srikakulam and Kerala, the actual figures have come down by almost 40% in the last 6-7 years. "One of the main reasons why cashew is not being exploited to the maximum effect is chiefly because unlike ten years ago, it is hard to procure full time labourers these days. This is because most of them are now NREGS workers employed through the summer and well into the rainy season."PS Rao, a small time farmer from Uratla, said, "NREGA has become the bane of the rural economy. The work audit is a sham as most NREGA workers do not spend more than two hours on the field."NREGS workers earn Rs 120 for two hours a day of work even though they are supposed to work for 6-7 hours a day. In a cashew farm, one has to pay Rs 300 per day for a day's work along with lunch.not of much needed for the poor.....even increase the 10000 more not a problem, until unless we are able to export...Sathya NAnother farmer KV Sarma of Makkavariplame village said, "The NREGA chapter itself is flawed as works are never completed on time and neither are they totally useful to the farming community. Micro factors have not been taken into account. How can NREGA be implemented in areas which are rich in horticultural growth, where summer crops such as cashew, mango and sapotta thrive?"Challa Raju of Bheemaboyinapalem village in Makkavaripalem mandal said, "I had to procure a team of twenty workers from three different villages to work in the fields. However, much of the skilled workers are no longer available."

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/

Brazil nut market goes global

22 July 2016

Modern processes of globalization and improvement of production and logistics processes stimulate the development of exotic product markets. For example, if earlier Brazil nuts were strictly a local commodity, now they are gaining popularity. The striving of the population towards healthy nutrition, along with doctors’ recommendations to include nutritious foods in the diet have been important factors in driving the growth of the Brazil nut market. Brazil nuts, valuable for their high content of selenium, are often recommended for a balanced diet.

According to the increasing demand for Brazil nuts, the market experienced a rise with an average annual growth rate of + 8.8% for the period from 2007 to 2014. The most notable increase was observed from 2008 to 2010, when the market increased almost twofold over three years, growing from 52 thousand tonnes in 2007 to 99 thousand tonnes in 2010. Since then, the market volume has not dipped below 90 thousand tonnes, but it has not shown rapid growth rates either.


Brazil nuts, also called Amazonian nuts, are named according to their area of origin, coinciding with the main growing regions. Therefore, according to market research conducted by IndexBox Marketing, 82% of Brazil nut production in 2014 was done by South American countries, namely, Bolivia, Brazil, and Peru. Bolivia takes a stable first place, with a 41.6% share of total production, while Brazil follows with a 35.4% share. It is remarkable that among the countries that produce Brazil nuts, West African countries have become more noticeable, in particular Cote d'Ivoire and the Gambia. Over the last 7 years, the combined share of these countries has increased by 5 percentage points in the global volume of Brazil nut production. This became possible due to more active growth rates of production. In Côte d'Ivoire, they amounted to + 6.8% from 2007 to 2014, and to + 34.6% in the Gambia for the period from 2011 to 2014. At the same time, the average annual growth rates of production in the leading countries were inferior, amounting to + 1.0% in Bolivia and + 3.4% in Brazil from 2007 to 2014.


Significant amounts of Brazil nuts are exported to foreign countries, which is natural for exotic products, as the main consumption centers are located outside the growing regions. In 2014, 21% of Brazil nut production volume was exported, which accounted for 22.7 thousand tonnes. Moreover, processed products are not included in this calculation, since in the producing countries (and intermediaries), nuts pass through certain stages of processing (peeling, drying, and packaging), before the kernels are exported. Imports and exports of Brazil nuts in shells and without shells are reviewed further.

Bolivia, Brazil, Peru, and the Gambia are the main producers of Brazil nuts as well as the key suppliers for exports. A remarkable amount of products is supplied from other countries that are not growing Brazil nuts, in this case, re-exports of products in processed or unprocessed form take place.

Bolivia is the largest producer of Brazil nuts in the world. It supplies products to the global markets in a processed form, without shell. In 2014, the volume of exports of processed products amounted to 23.6 thousand tonnes, which is equal to 60.8% of total peeled nut exports. In turn, the ratio of the product supplies from Brazil is the opposite, as this country mostly supplies nuts in shells, with exports standing at 7.1 thousand tonnes, which accounts for 31.2% of global unprocessed nut exports.


There is a tendency of reduction in export supply of both processed and unprocessed nuts from Brazil, with an increasing amount going to the domestic market. Also, a reduction in supplies of Brazil nuts with shells on the background of peeled nut supply growth should be noted. As a result, the share of peeled nuts in the domestic market is growing, and the volume of shelled nut exports is increasing.


As an imported product, peeled Brazil nuts are in the highest demand. In 2014, the global import volume of Brazil nuts in shell amounted to only 9.5 thousand tonnes, while the volume of shelled nuts accounted for 34.7 thousand tonnes. In terms of imports of shelled Brazil nuts, the U.S. takes first place (25%), followed by the UK (17%), Germany (17%), and the Netherlands (5%).

Just like exports, the imports of peeled nuts are growing too, with the average annual growth rates amounting to + 1.4% from 2007 to 2014. The highest average annual growth rates were observed in Germany (+ 14.0%), while the volumes of supplies in the two leading countries (the U.S. and the UK) were generally declining. The shares of other countries are growing, including new countries that participate in trade.


Imports of Brazil nuts with shells also have a wide geographic span, but economically developed countries are the key players. Peru is the exception, having imported 35% of global import volume of Brazil nuts with shell in 2014, for peeling and further nut kernel exports. Spain (13%) took second place in terms of unpeeled nut imports, followed by the U.S. (8%), Italy (7%), Qatar (7%), and the Netherlands (5%).


Brazil nuts, being an exotic product, have great prospects in the global market. Despite the temporary stagnation of the Brazil nut market, it is possible to note a number of positive aspects, contributing to its development. Among those are the increases in the share of shelling in the Brazil nut producing countries, diversification both in producing countries and importing countries, popularization of healthy nutrition among the population, and urbanization. Some of the constraints are the global crisis, political and economic phenomena in the world, hindered investments in the industry, and the purchasing power of the population.

For more information:
Inna Ivonina
IndexBox Marketing
Tel: +44 20 3239 3063

Publication date: 7/22/2016
Source: http://www.freshplaza.com/article/161126/Brazil-nut-market-goes-global

Nigeria, World’s fourth largest producer of cashew nuts eyes 175,000 mts in six months


Friday, July 22, 2016



Nigeria is expected to record increase in its cashew nut production in coming years due to renewed focus by the government and increasing demand for the commodity across developed countries and Asia. The Chief Executive Officer of the Nigeria Export Promotion Council, Mr. Segun Awolowo, stated this during a recent workshop on cashew processing and market information system in Lagos. According to Awolowo, cashew is expected to yield 175,000 metric tonnes at the end of this year’s trading season, up from a yield of 150,000 metric tonnes in 2015.

He added that recent government’s efforts in the development of additional cashew plantations, distribution of improved seedlings to farmers; enforced good agricultural practices were all going to increase output of cashew nuts in Nigeria by 30 per cent in two years. Nigeria is rated as the fourth largest producer of cashew nuts in Africa and seventh in the world, with the bulk of its raw cashew nuts and cashew kernels exported to Vietnam and India, respectively. According to the NEPC CEO in 2011, Vietnam imported over $140m worth of RCN and $46m worth of cashew kernel from Nigeria, adding that in recent years, export of Nigeria RCN had been increasing. He said, “With a projected output of 175,000 metric tonnes of RCN in the just-concluded 2016 trading season, Nigeria is expected to earn over $200m at an average price of $1,200 per tonne in the international market.

“Working with the USAID|Nigeria Expanded Trade and Transport project, the council has developed a cashew sector strategy for the cashew value chain in Nigeria. The cashew strategy is expected to improve the quality of Nigeria’s RCN and enhance the transparency of the Nigerian cashew industry by developing a Market Information System.

“Other measures put in place by the Federal Government to improve Nigeria’s export of RCN include enforcement of good agricultural practices at farmers’ field, setting up of up-country warehouses and drying centres in production areas to ensure strict compliance with moisture content as quality requirements and establishment of the Nigeria Commodity Exchange market for transparent trading system.”

The workshop, which was organised by the African Cashew Alliance, USAID West Africa Trade and Investment Hub and USAID/NEXTT Project, unveiled the Cashew Marketing Information System that was developed by ACA to reflect reference pricing for cashew traders and market analysts. The Managing Director of ACA, Dr.  Babafemi Oyewole, stated that the MIS would address essential skills and knowledge needed to interpret and understand the global cashew market by enabling direct negotiations between buyers and sellers.  “Being able to predict and interpret market trends is crucial to long-term business sustainability,” he added. The Accra-based ACA has over a decade, sought to improve the competiveness and sustainability of African cashew industry and increase the processing of cashew on the continent, hoping to increase processing from the current 15 per cent to 30 per cent in the next five years. “Ultimately, our objective is to facilitate the development of an industry that benefits the entire value chain, from farmer to consumer” Oyewole stated.

Source: naija247news.com

Thứ Năm, 21 tháng 7, 2016

Nigeria: Opportunities in cashew processing

July 20, 2016




Demand for cashew continues to grow, stimulated by its increasing export potential, its rapidly increasing demand as snack and for its nutritional value, among others. Through the African Cashew Alliance (ACA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) partnership with the Nigeria Expanded Trade and Transport Programme, (NEXTT), a new generation of agro entrepreneurs may soon appear on the horizon, DANIEL ESSIET reports.

The thought of growing the   cashew tree (Anacardium Occidentale tree) before now would not appeal to some farmers. This is not unconnected with its long years of maturity and the low income it generates.

Planting and  maturity takes between 36 and 48 months. Its production does not begin until 10 years after planting. The tree bears fruits for another 25 to 30 years.

But the tide is changing for the Raw Cashew Nuts (RCN).

In 2011, its global revenue value  was estimated at between $1.5billion and $2 billion, and global yearly production hitting 2.1 million tons.

Nigeria’s cashew production output was  between 150,000 and 130,000 metric tonnes in 2013 and 2014, placing her as the  fourth largest producer of cashew nuts in Africa and seventh in the world.

This development, and more, has propelled investors, such as the Chief Executive Officer, Matnad Industries Limited, Ifeanyi Chu  Ugwu, an Abia State-based entrepreneur, to venture into cashew planting and processing.

For Ugwu, investment in the product is not a waste of time or resources considering that every part of it is useful.

A breakdown of its composition reveal that Cashew nuts consist of 35-45 per cent seeds and around 55-65 per cent of shells. The shells contain 15-30 per cent oil. A ton of nuts contains around 200 kg seeds and 180 kg oil (cashew nut oil or cashew nut shell liquid CNSL).CNSL is used as oil in industry. This explains why the product is now in high demand.

Ugwu, who started the business  when nobody was knowledgeable about it, explained that his company is now the flagship of this business, representing the exciting trend of agribusiness entrepreneurs using opportunities for value-added manufacturing that creates jobs and grow the gross domestic product (GDP) of the country. The company is already operating successfully in the market and has attained a certain size.

To  boost local production, Anga stressed   the need  for  investment  in more cashew trees. With  investment of between N800,000 and N20 million, return on investment varies between 15 and 30 per cent.

There are opportunities for young  entrepreneurs interested in becoming mini processors, suppliers, village shop owners and local buying agents. The major component of a cashew processing unit is land, building, plant and machinery, and civil works. Basic equipment include cooking vessels, semi-automated peeling machine,multi-colour cashew kernel sorting machine, husk winnowing machine, steam pipeline, hot oven, hand operated cutting machine, peeling machine, filling machine, pieces separator, weighing scale, sealing machine, food grade plastic tubs, buckets, crates , bowls and generator set .  Apart from  a plot of land, a standard  cashew processing unit requires a processing, drying, and packing area.

The farmers  sell raw to local processors like Ugwu  who process them to kernels, shell and rejects used as feed ingredients. The pre-processed kernels are sent to factories for further grading, packaging and export.Cashew kernels are further processed and used as snacks. It can also be processed as juice , spirits and jams. At  small-scale factories, the nuts are steamed, shelled by  hand, and then pre-graded to ensure a high percentage of whole kernels.

Anga said cashew nut is a major answer to the development of the non-oil sector, adding that the government has neglected the sector for too long. He  said if the cashew crop was processed locally, new direct jobs would be created by  processing businesses that would arise from the industry and millions of naira would be realised.

He said a large quantity of cashew produced are exported rather than processed locally or consumed in the country.

But there are challenges in cashew processing, notably, the countless  exporters compared to local processors. Ugwu said processing of cashew is manual and highly labour intensive.

For watchers, developing a competitive private sector processing industry would create jobs. As a major producer of cashew nuts in the world,  USAID Nigeria Expanded Trade and Transport Programme (NEXTT) Export and Business Development Promotion Team Leader, Mr Bob Ezumah said the quality of Nigeria’s cashew nut and cashew kernel has been a major issue affecting the export potential and pricing of the commodity that now fascinates the entire world, immensely.

He  maintained that  USAID NIGERIA funded NEXTT project has in the last four years worked tirelessly with strategic partners such as the Nigeria Export Promotion Council (NEPC) and the National Cashew Association of Nigeria (NCAN) to address this challenge.

Such strategic interventions include trainings and sponsoring Nigeria cashew traders on international tours and conferences for market linkages, which has increased the sale of Nigeria’s raw cashew nuts to almost 200,000 metric tonnes in the last trading season. The market linkage provided by NEXTT to the buyers in Vietnam and India, he noted, eliminated the role of Dubai-based middlemen, who had over the years, denied Nigerian traders, their maximum profits.

The project, he  added, has also worked with NEPC to develop the Nigerian Cashew Strategy which has enabled the Federal Government to list cashew among the top 15 export crop of Nigeria.

USAID|NIGERIA, through the NEXTT project, is facilitating the development and expansion of cashew processing facilities because of its immense potential to create hundreds of jobs for women and youths.

Source:http://thenationonlineng.net

Thứ Tư, 20 tháng 7, 2016

Ghana: Limited access to local raw cashew nuts - Processors forced to import

20 July 2016



The biggest cashew processing company in West Africa, USIBRAS Ghana has appealed to the government to better support the country’s cashew processors, as it is forced to import 5,000 metric tonnes of raw cashew nuts from Guinea Bissau, due to the limited access to high quality raw cashew nuts in Ghana.

The company said on July 5th 2016, it received the first shipment of 3,500 metric tonnes of raw cashew nuts from Melo Ltda, a cashew company in Guinea-Bissau, and is expecting the second shipment of an additional 1,500 metric tonnes of raw cashew nuts this week to supply their current factory demands.

Mr. Tarciso Falcao, Operations Director of USIBRAS Ghana Limited in a statement copied to the B&FT said: “We need prompt policies on the taxation of raw cashew nut exports, the establishment of a two months export window for raw cashew nuts, a minimum price for farmers per season and a long-term plan for the sustainable development of a flourishing cashew sector.”

Since the introduction and immediate withdrawal of an export window for raw cashew nuts in the beginning of 2016, the potentials and challenges of the cashew sector have been on the country’s government agenda.

However, until this date no policies seem to have been put in place to support cashew processors in Ghana.

“We are currently importing raw cashew nuts from our neighboring countries Benin, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire and at the moment even from Guinea Bissau. We rely on these imports because the majority of raw cashew nuts are exported without adding local value”, said Mr. Falcao.

“We have established the largest cashew processing factory in West Africa with an installed processing capacity of 30,000 metric tonnes per year for raw cashew nut processing and with potential employment opportunities for 2000 people.

However, we currently operate on only 6,000 metric tonnes per year, which is 20 % of the installed processing capacity due to domestic shortages in raw materials”, he added.

Ghana produces about 68,000 metric tonnes of raw cashew nuts per year. The installed raw cashew nut processing capacity of all 13 existing processors amounts to 65,000 metric tonnes per year.

The potential of the cashew sector in the country is tremendous. If the installed processing capacity is used to its fullest potential of 65,000 MT and some 13,000 jobs will be created.

Exported raw cashew nut valued at US$ 48,750,000 is less than half the value of processed kernels US$ 113,750,000.

Source: ghanaweb.com

Thứ Ba, 19 tháng 7, 2016

Nigeria: Cashew output ‘ll grow by 30%’

Mon July 18, 2016




Cashew nut production is to rise due to renewed focus by the government and demand for the commodity, the Executive Secretary, Nigeria Export Promotion Council (NEPC), Segun Awolowo, has said.

He spoke at a workshop on cashew processing and Market Information Systems in Lagos.

Represented by a Chief Trade Promotion Officer, Mr Kazim Ahmed, Awolowo said: “Recent government’s efforts in the development of additional cashew plantations, distribution of improved seedlings to farmers, enforced good agricultural practices are all going to increase output of cashew nuts in Nigeria by 30 per cent in the next two years.”

Nigeria is rated as the fourth largest producer of cashew nuts in Africa and seventh in the world, with the bulk of its Raw Cashew Nuts (RCN) and cashew kernels exported to Vietnam and India. They are both leading processors of cashew nuts in the world.

Awolowo noted “in 2011, Vietnam imported over $140million worth of RCN and $46million worth of cashew kernel from Nigeria”, adding: “In recent years, export of Nigeria RCN has been increasing.”

With a projected output of 175,000 metric tons of RCN in this trading season, Nigeria is expected earn over $200million at an average  price of $1,200 per ton in the international market. Awolowo affirmed the increasing output of Nigeria’s cashew with the production of 150,000 and 130,000 metric tons in 2014 and 2013.

To further improve Nigeria’s cashew production, Awolowo stated that working with the USAID-Nigeria NEXTT project, the council has developed a cashew sector strategy for the cashew value chain in Nigeria. The cashew strategy is expected to improve the quality of Nigeria’s RCN and enhance the transparency of the cashew industry by developing a Market Information System (MIS).

He added that other measure put in place by the Federal Government to improve export of RCN includes “enforcement of good agricultural practices at farmers’ field, setting up of up-country warehouses and drying centres in production areas to ensure strict compliance to moisture content as quality requirements and establishment of the Nigeria Commodity Exchange market for transparent trading system.”

Source: http://thenationonlineng.net/cashew-output-ll-grow-30/

Thứ Hai, 18 tháng 7, 2016

Nigeria to earn $200m from cashew nut production



Mon July 18, 2016



Nigeria is to earn $200 million from cashew nut production in the next two years from its planned 30 percent increase as a result of renewed government focus. Executive Secretary of Nigeria Export Promotion Council (NEPC), Segun Awolowo, disclosed this at the workshop on cashew processing and Market Information Systems in Lagos.

He said Nigeria was expected earn over $200million at an average price of $1,200 per ton in the international market. He said: “Recent government’s efforts in the development of additional cashew plantations, distribution of improved seedlings to farmers, enforced good agricultural practices are all going to increase output of cashew nuts in Nigeria by 30 percent in the next two years. “Nigeria is rated to be the fourth largest producer of cashew nuts in Africa and seventh in the world, with the bulk of its Raw Cashew Nuts, RCN, and cashew kernels exported to Vietnam and India, respectively.

They are both leading processors of cashew nuts in the world.” Awolowo noted that in 2011, Vietnam imported over $140million worth of RCN and $46million worth of cashew kernel from Nigeria, adding that in recent years, export of Nigeria RCN had been on the increase. He, however, affirmed the increasing output of Nigeria’s cashew with the production of 150,000 and 130,000 metric tons in 2014 and 2013 respectively. To further improve Nigeria’s cashew production, Awolowo stated that working with the USAID|Nigeria Expanded Trade and Transport, NEXTT project, the council had developed a cashew sector strategy for the cashew value chain in Nigeria. According to him, the cashew strategy is expected to improve the quality of Nigeria’s RCN and enhance the transparency of the Nigeria cashew industry by developing a Market Information System.

Sour ce: http://www.vanguardngr.com/

Ghana: 5,000m/t of raw cashew nuts imported from Guinea Bissau

Mon July 18, 2016



USIBRAS Ghana Limited, the biggest cashew processing company in West Africa, has appealed to government for better support to the country’s cashew processors as it is importing 5,000 metric tons of raw cashew nuts from Guinea Bissau due to the limited access to high quality raw cashew nuts in Ghana.

The company said on July 5th 2016, it received the first shipment of 3,500 metric tons of raw cashew nuts from Melo Ltda, a cashew company in Guinea-Bissau, and is expecting the second shipment of an additional 1,500 metric tons of raw cashew nuts this week to supply their current factory demands.

Mr. Tarciso Falcao, Operations Director of USIBRAS Ghana Limited in a statement copied to the B&FT said: “We need prompt policies on the taxation of raw cashew nut exports, the establishment of a two months export window for raw cashew nuts, a minimum price for farmers per season and a long-term plan for the sustainable development of a flourishing cashew sector.”

Since the introduction and immediate withdrawal of an export window for raw cashew nuts in the beginning of 2016, the potentials and challenges of the cashew sector have been on the country’s government agenda.

However, until this date no policies seem to have been put in place to support cashew processors in Ghana.

Sources from the industry recognised the risk that without sector regulations to improve access to raw cashew nuts the Ghanaian cashew industry may collapse, thus affecting actors in the cashew value chain; predominantly cashew farmers.

“We are currently importing raw cashew nuts from our neighboring countries Benin, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire and at the moment even from Guinea Bissau. We rely on these imports because the majority of raw cashew nuts are exported without adding local value”, said Mr. Falcao.

“We have established the largest cashew processing factory in West Africa with an installed processing capacity of 30,000 metric tons per year for raw cashew nut processing and with potential employment opportunities for 2000 people.

However, we currently operate on only 6,000 metric tons per year, which is 20 % of the installed processing capacity due to domestic shortages in raw materials”, he added.

As a Ghanaian registered company, USIBRAS Ghana Limited stressed their vision: A flourishing cashew industry in Ghana.

Mr. Falcao explained that: “We are employing about 600 people from the surrounding communities in our factory and are committed to boosting local cashew production.”.

USIBRAS, in cooperation with the Dutch-based NGO Fair Match Support launched a programme to train farmers on good agricultural practices to increase cashew yields and quality.

“We need the farmers to provide our raw materials and we should find a solution that benefits the farmers, in terms of fair prices as well as providing a constant availability of raw material to the processing industry”, he added.

Ghana produces about 68,000 metric tons of raw cashew nuts per year. The installed raw cashew nut processing capacity of all 13 existing processors amounts to 65,000 metric tons per year.

The potential of the cashew sector in the country is tremendous. If the installed processing capacity is used to its fullest potential of 65,000 MT, some 13,000 jobs will be created with an aggregated wage of GHS 39,000,000 for women in rural areas excluding middle and top management of the factory.

Exported raw cashew nut valued at US$ 48,750,000 is less than half the value of processed kernels US$ 113,750,000.

Source: http://www.ghanaweb.com/

Tanzania: Premier directs board to remove nuisance levies on cashew nuts


Mon July 18, 2016



PRIME Minister Kassim Majaliwa has directed the Cashewnut Board of Tanzania (CBT) to implement his directives of removing five out of nine nuisance taxes that farmers were required to pay.

Speaking in Mtwara yesterday, the Prime Minister said the removal of the taxes begins in this year’s cashew nut farming season. According to a statement from the Prime Minister’s Office, Majaliwa made the remarks when he was briefed on the removal of some of the nuisance levies on the cashew nut industry by Mtwara Regional Commissioner, Halima Dendego.“Local government officials at all levels should ensure that these directives are implemented.

Our objective is to reduce the burden of taxes on farmers so that they can benefit more from their produce,” he said. He said the government decided to remove the levies after realizing that they were a burden to farmers driving them to criticise the warehouse receipt system.

“From this year, the government has decided that every cashew nut businessperson must make initial payments before going into auction markets so that we can buy the crop and ensure farmers receive their payments on time.

The Prime Minister also directed the Cashew nut Industry Development Trust Fund to conduct research to determine the reason behind low production of cashews in the country.

“I will meet with leaders of the Cashew nut Industry Development Trust Fund so they can tell me what they have done in the last three years and their future plans... if there are no future plans we will take an in-depth look as to why they have a lot of money but cannot even provide seeds to farmers,” he explained.

In another development, Prime Minister Majaliwa directed the Cashew nut Board of Tanzania to ensure that farmers receive on time better farm inputs to enable them increase production.

Source: http://www.dailynews.co.tz/