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Thứ Sáu, 28 tháng 7, 2017

Vietnam: Agro-forestry-aquatic exports hit $20.45 billion in 7 months

27 July 2017



The export value of agro-forestry-aquatic products reached 20.45 billion USD in the first seven months of this year, up 14.7 percent against the same period last year, reported to the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development.

Key farm produce raked in 10.89 billion USD (up 18 percent) while aquatic products earned 4.31 billion USD (up 17.5 percent) and forestry products brought home 4.41 billion USD (up 10.8 percent). 
Vietnam shipped 3.3 million tonnes of rice worth 1.5 billion USD abroad, up 15.7 percent in volume and 13.7 percent in value compared to the Jan-July period of 2016.
Meanwhile, coffee and cashew nut exports maintained stable growth in the period thanks to higher prices. The country earned 2.12 billion USD from exporting 937,000 tonnes of coffee and 1.83 billion USD from shipping 186,000 tonnes of cashew nuts.
Vegetable and fruit exports witnessed a year-on-year rise of 50 percent in export value to 2.03 billion USD in the reviewed period.
The export value of rubber also recorded a strong surge, reaching 1.13 billion USD, 59 percent higher than that in the same period last year.
Meanwhile, pepper export turnover suffered an 18 percent fall to 800 million USD due to a 30 percent drop in prices.

VNA
Source: http://english.vietnamnet.vn/fms/business/182723/agro-forestry-aquatic-exports-hit--20-45-billion-in-7-months.html 

Vietnam eats into India's cashew export plans

28 July 2017


Zooming price of imported raw nuts and dip in export prices have made export unviable for India. 

KOCHI: Vietnam may spoil India’s plans to raise its cashew exports as it has cornered a large share of raw nuts from West Africa for processing. 

India's cashew export has been falling in the last two years. From 1.2 lakh tonnes in 2014-15, it plummeted to 82,302 tonnes last year. 

Zooming price of imported raw nuts and dip in export prices have made export unviable for India. India imports over 60% of its raw nut requirement for processing. "Vietnam has been buying raw nuts from West Africa at a higher price to meet its export requirement. As a result the raw nut price has escalated to $2450 per tonne," said P Sundaran, chairman of Cashew Export Promotion Council of India. India’s export had looked good in the first two months of the fiscal. 

As its processing cost is lower, Vietnam has been selling below India’s rate. "The US and Europe have started buying from Vietnam as its cashew is cheaper though our cashew is superior in quality. We need support from the government through incentives for export," Sundaran said. 

Aggressive selling by Vietnam has pushed down the cashew prices in the export market. It has tumbled from over $ 5 per pound to $4.8. "Vietnam has targeted an export of 3.65 lakh tonnes for which it has been buying and stocking raw nuts till September-October," said K Prakash Rao, managing partner of Kalbavi Cashews. 
India is hoping to buy more raw cashew of better quality from Indonesia and East Africa, where the harvest season is expected to be a month earlier by August-September. "The Indian production is better than last year which may meet the needs of local manufacturers," Rao said. 

Indian cashew industry is gearing up for good domestic season with the onset of festival season from August. `` Post GST the stock of most traders is empty and hence they are likely to buy to raise inventory. At present the price in the local market is around Rs 810 per kg compared with Rs 725 per kg in the export market. The prices may rise further when the festival season begins,’’ Rao said. 
India is currently the largest consumer of cashews with consumption touching 3 lakh tonnes, two times the export. The consumption is growing at a rate of 5% annually. 

Thứ Tư, 26 tháng 7, 2017

Bamba Adama (Pca Fenapaci) / Future of the cashew nut sector of Côte d'Ivoire "Transformation is our battle horse ..."

26 July 2017





Despite its status as the world's leading producer of raw cashew nuts, Côte d'Ivoire, should focus on local processing in order to bring added value to this speculation. Interview with Mr Bamba Adama, Pca of the National Federation of Cashew Producers of Côte d'Ivoire (Fenapaci) 

Mr. Bamba Adama, you are the President of the National Federation of Cashew Producers of Cote d'Ivoire (Fenapaci). Could you introduce us to that structure? 

Before you introduce this federation, let me introduce myself to your readers. I am Bamba Adama, the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the National Federation of Cashew Producers of Cote d'Ivoire (Fenapaci), based in Korhogo. I was appointed Pca after an election that allowed us to go through all the cashew production areas of our country. We had to elect 21 delegates in the presence of the prefects and sub-prefects of those regions. Before the formation of our federation we met the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development. Precisely the Director of the Cabinet who, with the assistance of the Directorate of Agricultural Professionals' Organizations (Dopa), presented the notes of the best unions of cooperatives and cooperative societies working in the cashew sector. It is with this list in mind that we have set up the Fenapaci. Based on the best cooperative societies in the 19 Côte d'Ivoire regions. It certainly had problems, but the most important thing is not to forget the general interest. Especially that of Côte d'Ivoire. Also, I am also Pca de l 'Ucabci which is located in the northern part of the Ivory Coast. In our union, we made 6 thousand tons during the campaign which has just ended. Today, I can tell you that our federation represents roughly 40% of Ivorian production. 
What is your assessment of the last marketing campaign for cashew nuts that has just come to an end? 

The campaign went well at the level of the producers with a price opening floor that was 440 FCFA per Kg, but we finished the campaign at 950Fcfa edge fields, given the evolution of the international market.However, it should not be forgotten that despite this good price and a production approaching 700 to 800 thousand tons, we had concerns about the supply of the local market which had to deal with the leakage, A part of Ivorian production. 

What is the cause of this cashew flight to some neighboring countries? 

When you talk about a price ranging between 800 to 950 FCFA per Kg in Côte d'Ivoire, in Ghana next door to Côté, the price was 1025 FCFA per Kg. As you can see it is already A problem of price and interest. It is not us producers who covet production outside but intermediaries, buyers and trackers who come to take the product with us. And yet, they have amenities. That is why we have asked the Cotton Council and the cashew board, which I would like to thank for the work it is doing on the ground to reduce this leak. The cotton and cashew council supported us in our actions against the escape of the cashew nut. With the establishment of a border monitoring and surveillance committee. It was not easy, since there was a part of the production that came out all the same. 


Should not the actors of the various producer countries unite to harmonize prices and bring prices to market? 


Absolutely. This is part of the prerogatives of the federation. As producers are making our pairs aware, to avoid fraudulent sales outside. We had a workshop in Korhogo on this topic. We are now seeing what measures to put in place to secure Ivorian production. Despite the good prices we can have outside, we must not forget that our country needs this financial windfall there too to develop. When the production goes to Ghana, it is true that one can gain 50Fcfa in addition but the State loses money. And do not forget the local transporters and processors. The same goes for our brothers who work at the harbor. We do not want our production to go to other countries. We need to not only keep our label but also control the market and be more competitive as the world's leading producer of raw nuts. 


It is said that there is a cartel in the chain that plays against the producers. True or false ? 


These are the interests at stake in the sector. We have several actors in the value chains: producers, exporters, buyers and processors. It should be understood that each try to pull the cover on oneself. Talking about a cartel is too much, we work alongside each other and try to work together so that there is not a weak link in the chain of values. If we as producers are winning all the time and exporters and processors do not win, you will see that the industry will not be able to move forward. We need to work in synergy so that we can get out of it. There is room for everyone. 


Should not Cote d'Ivoire right now focus on local processing and consumption? 


The transformation especially. It's our battle horse. After meeting the challenge of quantity, we are working on that of quality. Who needs to improve. As far as the transformation is concerned, we say that it is essential first of all for the State of Côte d'Ivoire but also for us producers. We realized that. The transformation will give added value to our product. It is good to sell at 900Fcfa the Kg but our wish and projection is to be able to sell the product at 1000Fcfa the Kg or even 1500Fcfa. Why not 2000Fcfa. It is the transformation alone that will enable us to obtain that price. During the last season, we were at 700 thousand tons of raw nuts but annually, Côte d'Ivoire produces more than 3 million 500 thousand tons of cashew apples that are thrown into the wild. It is not normal. In Brazil, for example, this apple is consumed.It is processed to serve as a livestock feed. One can make from this apple juice and vinegar among others.The state is encouraging this transformation there at the local level. 


There was talk of setting up regional and interprofessional stores. Where are we ? 


It's still in the planning stage. As you know, any project requires funding. Funding is always the most difficult aspect of implementing our projects. Banks do not follow us for various reasons. This store project aimed to address marketing challenges and profitability. The cashew nut is a self-sustaining and self-supporting sector that can take care of itself. We are confident that these stores will be born. In the future, for example, they can be transformed into a local processing unit. In the reform, provision was made for the establishment of an authority; what was done. It is also planned to establish a reserve of prudence and interprofession among others. In the past, an interprofession had been created. Today, it no longer exists.The council-cotton casa has priorities and these are subjects that are on the table of that authority there. 


Bamba Mafoumgbé, bamaf2000@yahoo.fr [...]


Source: http://amanien.info/news/7902-bamba-adama-pca-fenapaci-avenir-de-la-filin-re-anacarde-de-cnite-d-a-ivoire-la-transformation-c-a-est-notre-cheval-de-bataille-a

India: CBI inquiry sought into corruption at Capex

26 July 2017



KOCHI: A petition has been filed before the high court seeking a CBI inquiry into alleged corruption of Rs 100 crore at Kerala State Cashew Workers Apex Industrial Cooperative Society Ltd (Capex) in purchasing low-quality cashew. It is alleged that the corruption occurred while R Jayachandran was the managing director of the society.



The petition filed by INTUC leader Kadakampally Manoj has also questioned an order issued by the government on March 29 making it mandatory to get sanction from the director of vigilance and anti-corruption bureau (VACB) before the VACB units can register an FIR.



A subsequent circular issued by VACB acting director Loknath Behera on May 25 making it mandatory to get his approval for proceedings on complaints received by VACB units has also been challenged before the court. Both the orders are illegal and are liable to be quashed, the petitioner has alleged.



Regarding the corruption at Capex, it is alleged that the total loss since the society was established in 1969, to 2011 was Rs 86.87 crore whereas the loss from 2011 to 2016 was Rs 100 crore.





A complaint was filed before VACB regarding the corruption at Capex by the petitioner and a quick verification was ordered in June last year. In May this year, VACB found out that there were enough materials to register an FIR against Jayachandran and three others. However, no FIR has been registered by VACB yet, the petitioner alleged.




VACB is not registering an FIR on the corruption at Capex presumably on the ground that no sanction has been received from VACB director. Sanction for registering an FIR was not being granted by the VACB director so as to help those who were involved in the corruption, the petitioner has alleged.




As per law, VACB should have registered an FIR upon finding that there were materials regarding the corruption. It is illegal not to register an FIR for want of sanction from the VACB director, the petitioner contended.



The state government and its officials have adopted a partisan attitude so as to help those involved in the corruption. In such circumstances, a CBI enquiry was warranted, the petition said.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/kochi/cbi-inquiry-sought-into-corruption-at-capex/articleshow/59765808.cms

India: Sweet makers find GST a tough nut to crack

26 July 2017



As fruit jellies, mousse, pastries and pies come under the 18% GST slab, some are considering renaming and re-packaging them as sweets to pay 5% tax.... 

CHENNAI: Would it bother you if halwa were designated 'jelly', and dhokla 'cake'? It is worrying mithai makers, though, as the goods and services tax (GST) has made taxation of sweets and savouries a minefield. 

For example, plain barfi, which is a 'sweet', is taxed at the lowest rate of 5%, but chocolate barfi with a chocolate-flavoured layer on top risks being bundled with chocolates and taxed at 28%. Even plain barfi garnished with card .. 

India: Pistachio declines on fall in demand

New Delhi, Jul 26 


Pistachio prices fell by Rs 5 per kg in the national capital today largely due to fall in demand from retailers and stockists amid sufficient stocks.

New Delhi, Jul 26 Pistachio prices fell by Rs 5 per kg in the national capital today largely due to fall in demand from retailers and stockists amid sufficient stocks.

Besides, increased arrivals from overseas markets too put pressure on pistachio prices.
Pistachio (hairati and peshawari) were down by Rs 5 each to settle at Rs 1,375-1,445 and Rs 1,495-1,595 per kg, respectively.

Traders said fall in demand from retailers and stockists against increased arrivals, mainly led to the fall in pistachio prices.

Following are today's quotations (per 40 kgs):

  • Almond (California) Rs 17,800-18,000, almond (gurbandi) Rs 12,000-12,100, almond (girdhi) Rs 5,100-5,200; abjosh afghani Rs 8,000-23,000, almond kernel (california) Rs 660-670 per kg, almond kernel (gurbandi) Rs 700-800 per kg, chilgoza (Roasted) (1 kg) Rs 2,500-2,700, 
  • cashew kernel 1 kg (no 180) Rs 1,070-1,080, cashew Kernel (no 210) Rs 945-960, cashew kernel (no 240) Rs 895-920, cashew kernel (no 320) Rs 795-820, cashew kernel broken 2 pieces Rs 670-770, cashew kernel broken 4 pieces Rs 650-765, cashew kernel broken 8 pieces Rs 550-660, 
  • copra (qtl) Rs 8,500-10,500, coconut powder (25 kgs) Rs 4,000 -4,400, dry dates Red (qtl) Rs 2,300-12,000, fig Rs 20,000- 26,000, kishmish kandhari local Rs 10,000-15,000, kishmish kandhari special Rs 9,000-21,000, kishmish Indian yellow Rs 3,500-4,800, kishmish Indian green Rs 5,000-7,500, 
  • pistachio Irani Rs 1,050-1,150, pistachio hairati Rs 1,375-1,445, pistachio peshawari Rs 1,495-1,595, pistachio dodi (roasted) 700-800, walnut Rs 270-380 and walnut kernel (1 kg) Rs 800- 1,300.

Source: https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/pistachio-declines-on-fall-in-demand/1108383

Kenya: Lift cashew export ban and win votes

25 July 2017

Unripe cashew nuts at a farm in Kwale County. Photo/Elkana Jacob
Unripe cashew nuts at a farm in Kwale County. Photo/Elkana Jacob

Cashew nut farmers get paid as little as Sh20 per kilo, compared to Sh70 per kilo in 2009 when the government introduced an export ban.
Cashew nut farmers in Kilifi, Kwale and Lamu are being cheated. Today the world price for raw cashew nuts is over Sh200.
The export ban was introduced at the request of a few local nut companies who did not want to pay the world price for cashews. They promised to export processed nuts globally but failed to do so.
The ban is killing the cashew nut industry in Kenya. Production has fallen below 10,000 tonnes annually yet Kenya's capacity is 60,000 tonnes.
Lamu county Women Rep Shakilla Abdalla wants the cashew export ban to be lifted (see P30).
She says over 10,000 farmers in Mpeketoni, Witu and Faza are uprooting cashew trees because they no longer make money.
If Jubilee or NASA want to win votes at the Coast, they should just promise to end the cruel export ban on raw cashew nuts.
Quote of the day: "Intense study of the Bible will keep any writer from being vulgar, in point of style." - English poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge was born on 25 July, 1834.
Thank you for participating in discussions on The Star, Kenya. Note that:
  • Unwarranted personal abuse and defamatory statements will be deleted.
  • Strong personal criticism is acceptable if justified by facts and arguments.
  • Deviation from points of discussion may lead to deletion of comments.

Source: http://www.the-star.co.ke/news/2017/07/25/lift-cashew-export-ban-and-win-votes_c1603238

Thứ Ba, 25 tháng 7, 2017

India: Almond declines on subdued demand

22 July 2017


New Delhi, Jul 22 Almond prices fell by Rs 100 per 40 kg in the national capital today due to muted demand from retailers and stockists amid adequate stocks on increased supplies

New Delhi, Jul 22 Almond prices fell by Rs 100 per 40 kg in the national capital today due to muted demand from retailers and stockists amid adequate stocks on increased supplies.

Almond (California) prices were down by Rs 100 to Rs 17,700-17,900 per 40 kg.
Traders attributed the fall in almond prices to subdued demand from retailers and stockists amid adequate stocks.

Following are today's quotations (per 40 kgs):

  • Almond (California) Rs 17,700-17,900, almond (gurbandi) Rs 12,000-12,100, almond (girdhi) Rs 5,100-5,200; abjosh afghani Rs 8,000-23,000, almond kernel (california) Rs 655-665 per kg, almond kernel (gurbandi) Rs 700-800 per kg, chilgoza (Roasted) (1 kg) Rs 2,500-2,700, 
  • cashew kernel 1 kg (no 180) Rs 1,075-1,085, cashew Kernel (no 210) Rs 950-965, cashew kernel (no 240) Rs 900-925, cashew kernel (no 320) Rs 800-825, cashew kernel broken 2 pieces Rs 670-770, cashew kernel broken 4 pieces Rs 650-765, cashew kernel broken 8 pieces Rs 550-660, 
  • copra (qtl) Rs 8,500-10,500, coconut powder (25 kgs) Rs 4,000-4,400, dry dates Red (qtl) Rs 2,300-12,000, fig Rs 20,000-26,000, kishmish kandhari local Rs 10,000-15,000, kishmish kandhari special Rs 9,000-21,000, kishmish Indian yellow Rs 3,500-4,800, kishmish Indian green Rs 5,000-7,500, pistachio Irani Rs 1,050-1,150, pistachio hairati Rs 1,380- 1,450, pistachio peshawari Rs 1,500-1,600, pistachio dodi (roasted) 700-800, walnut Rs 270-380 and walnut kernel (1 kg) Rs 800-1,300.


Source: https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/almond-declines-on-subdued-demand/1105348

India: Pistachio falls on subdued demand

20 July 2017



New Delhi, Jul 20 () Pistachio prices eased by Rs 10 per kg in the national capital today largely due to subdued demand from retailers and stockists.

Adequate stocks position following increased arrivals from overseas markets also put pressure on pistachio prices.

Pistachio (hairati and peshawari) fell Rs 10 each to conclude at Rs 1,380-1,450 and Rs 1,500-1,600 per kg, respectively.

Traders said sluggish demand from retailers and stockists against increased arrivals, mainly led to the fall in pistachio prices.

Following are today's quotations (per 40 kgs):


  • Almond (California) Rs 17,800-18,000, almond (gurbandi) Rs 12,000-12,100, almond (girdhi) Rs 5,100-5,200; abjosh afghani Rs 8,000-23,000, almond kernel (california) Rs 655-665 per kg, almond kernel (gurbandi) Rs 700-800 per kg, chilgoza (Roasted) (1 kg) Rs 2,500-2,700, 
  • cashew kernel 1 kg (no 180) Rs 1,075-1,085, cashew Kernel (no 210) Rs 950-965, cashew kernel (no 240) Rs 900-925, cashew kernel (no 320) Rs 800-825, cashew kernel broken 2 pieces Rs 670-770, cashew kernel broken 4 pieces Rs 650-765, cashew kernel broken 8 pieces Rs 550-660, 
  • copra (qtl) Rs 8,500-10,500, coconut powder (25 kg) Rs 4,000- 4,400, dry dates Red (qtl) Rs 2,300-12,000, fig Rs 20,000- 26,000, kishmish kandhari local Rs 10,000-15,000, kishmish kandhari special Rs 9,000-21,000, kishmish Indian yellow Rs 3,500-4,800, kishmish Indian green Rs 5,000-7,500, 
  • pistachio Irani Rs 1,050-1,150, pistachio hairati Rs 1,380-1,450, pistachio peshawari Rs 1,500-1,600, pistachio dodi (roasted) 700-800, 
  • walnut Rs 270-380 and walnut kernel (1 kg) Rs 800- 1,300. 


DP SUN DPL SRK

Source: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/business/india-business/pistachio-falls-on-subdued-demand/articleshow/59681160.cms

USA: Cashew nuts may help boost cognitive development in babies

07/19/2017

Researchers have found that by eating cashews during pregnancy and lactation, mothers can improve their offspring's cognitive development. This was revealed in a new study, published in the "International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience."

Researchers noted that cashew nuts are rich in essential fatty acids, which are crucial for the development of the brain.

The researchers split rats into three groups: control, which was treated with 7% lipid derived from soybean oil; normolipdic, treated with 7% lipids derived from cashew nuts; and hyperlipidic, treated with 20% lipids derived from cashew nuts.

The study concluded: "The results of the lipid profile of the brain at the end of the experiment showed an increase in levels of saturated fatty acids and less Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in animals of the hyperlipidic group."

"The data showed that maternal consumption of cashew nuts can accelerate reflex maturation and facilitate memory in offspring when offered in adequate quantities."

source: foodnavigator-asia.com

Publication date: 7/19/2017
Source: http://www.freshplaza.com/article/179082/Cashew-nuts-may-help-boost-cognitive-development-in-babies

India: Cashew rises on buying support

15 July 2017


Almond (California) Rs 17,800-18,000, almond (gurbandi) Rs 12,100-12,200, almond (girdhi) Rs 5,200-5,300; abjosh afghani Rs 8,000-23,000, almond kernel (california) Rs 640-650 per kg, almond kernel (gurbandi) Rs 700-800 per kg, chilgoza (Roasted) (1 kg) Rs 2,600-2,800, cashew kernel 1 kg (no 180) Rs 1,080-1,090, cashew Kernel (no 210) Rs 955-970, cashew kernel (no 240) Rs 905-930, cashew kernel (no 320) Rs 805-830, cashew kernel broken 2 pieces Rs 675-775, cashew kernel broken 4 pieces Rs 655-77

New Delhi, Jul 15 Cashew prices rose by Rs 10 per kg in the national capital today on increased buying support from retailers and stockists amid low stocks.

Furthermore, fall in supplies from growing regions also supported the uptrend.

Cashew kernel No 180, No 210, No 240 and No 320 rose by Rs 10 each to conclude at Rs 1,080-1,090, Rs 955-970, Rs 905- 930 and Rs 805-830 per kg, respectively.

Marketmen said increased buying by retailers and stockists against restricted supplies from growing belts, mainly pushed up cashew prices.

Following are today's quotations (per 40 kgs):

  • Almond (California) Rs 17,800-18,000, almond (gurbandi) Rs 12,100-12,200, almond (girdhi) Rs 5,200-5,300; abjosh afghani Rs 8,000-23,000, almond kernel (california) Rs 640-650 per kg, almond kernel (gurbandi) Rs 700-800 per kg, chilgoza (Roasted) (1 kg) Rs 2,600-2,800, 
  • cashew kernel 1 kg (no 180) Rs 1,080-1,090, cashew Kernel (no 210) Rs 955-970, cashew kernel (no 240) Rs 905-930, cashew kernel (no 320) Rs 805-830, cashew kernel broken 2 pieces Rs 675-775, cashew kernel broken 4 pieces Rs 655-770, cashew kernel broken 8 pieces Rs 555-665, 
  • copra (qtl) Rs 8,600-10,600, coconut powder (25 kgs) Rs 4,100 -4,500, dry dates Red (qtl) Rs 2,300-12,000, fig Rs 20,000- 26,000, kishmish kandhari local Rs 10,000-15,000, kishmish kandhari special Rs 9,000-21,000, kishmish Indian yellow Rs 3,600-4,900, kishmish Indian green Rs 5,100-7,600, pistachio Irani Rs 1,050-1,150, pistachio hairati Rs 1,390-1,460, pistachio peshawari Rs 1,510-1,600, pistachio dodi (roasted) 700-800, walnut Rs 280-390 and walnut kernel (1 kg) Rs 810- 1,310.


Source: https://www.outlookindia.com/newsscroll/cashew-rises-on-buying-support/1099701

India: Govt. clears three export infra plans

16 July 2017



Cargo terminal at Imphal airport, modernisation of Karnataka facility for marine exports receive nod

With deficient infrastructure severely hurting the competitiveness of India’s exports, the Centre – for the first time under a new scheme launched in March to address the problem — has given its approval for three proposals including one to establish an Integrated Cargo Terminal (ICT) at the Imphal International Airport.
The other applications that received the green signal from an (Inter-Ministerial) Empowered Committee (EC) chaired by Commerce Secretary Rita Teaotia were: modernisation of infrastructure facility in Karnataka for marine exports – where the total cost is ₹13.34 crore; and construction of a new ‘Standard Design Factory’ building at Cochin Special Economic Zone (SEZ) for which a total of ₹61.63 crore will have to be spent, official sources told The Hindu.
The EC on ‘Trade Infrastructure for Export Scheme (TIES)’ — in its first ever meeting that was held on June 9 — deferred on technical grounds an application to set up “the first dedicated facility” in India to test medical devices.
This is proposed to be established at the Andhra Pradesh Med Tech Zone in Visakhapatnam – with four separate facilities at a total cost of about ₹169 crore.
The Indian medical device market was worth about $4 billion in 2015 and exports of these items from India were close to $1 billion (in 2016).
The EC has, however, granted an in-principle nod for a proposal to establish a ‘Coastal Cashew Research and Development Foundation’ in Karnataka, for which the total cost estimated is ₹10 crore.
The cost of building the ICT at Imphal is ₹16.2 crore, of which the share of TIES is ₹12.96 crore and that of the Airport Authority of India (AAI) is ₹3.24 crore. The AAI is learnt to have informed the EC that there was no cargo facility at the Imphal airport, and that the proposed ICT “would act as a hub for air cargo movement and air connectivity to South-East Asian countries.”

‘₹600 crore allocation’

The TIES, which is being implemented from FY18 till FY20, has a budgetary allocation of ₹600 crore. The scheme’s annual outlay is ₹200 crore.
According to a March 2016 report on ‘Export Infrastructure in India’ by the Department Related Parliamentary Standing Committee on Commerce, “deficient infrastructure and the manner in which infrastructure is being operated (in India) are the major obstacles to ensure competitiveness in manufacturing of goods and exports thereof.”
The report said Indian exports lose competitiveness on account of huge logistics costs. It noted that “the logistic cost in India is about 14% of the GDP whereas in advanced economies like the U.S. and the European Union, it is 8% and 10% of the GDP respectively.”
The Standing Committee further said, “Owing to sub-optimal logistic capability, certain sectors dependent on logistics lose as much as 2% on sales return. An ASSOCHAM study conducted a few years ago shows that India runs against a disadvantage of about 11% of its trade due to deficient infrastructure.”
According to an ASSOCHAM-Resurgent India joint study, “India can save up to $50 billion if logistics costs are brought down from 14% to 9% of country’s GDP thereby making domestic goods more competitive in global markets.” As per the Commerce Ministry, the objective of the TIES is to “enhance export competitiveness by bridging gaps in export infrastructure, creating focused export infrastructure and first-mile and last-mile connectivity.”
Source: http://www.thehindu.com/business/govt-clears-three-export-infra-plans/article19290200.ece

USA: 5 sneaky ways to add nuts in your child’s diet

17 July 2017

Toddlers seldom take a liking to nuts. Here are ways to include them in their diet.

Nuts like almonds, cashew and pine nuts have many nutritional benefits. Even traditionally, feeding nuts and dried fruits to toddlers is given importance as it is said to add to their nutrition and is an important part of their diet. The only problem is, children, especially toddlers, don’t really take a liking to eating nuts easily. I am yet to meet a child under 6 who readily chews onto nuts. Even adding it in kheer or other dessert preparations does not work with toddlers as they will spit it out. So how do you make sure that your toddler receives all the goodness of eating nuts without making a face or spitting it out? Easy. Hide it in her meals. She can’t spit out something if she can’t taste it bite it. Apart from adding nuts in my daughter’s saatu maavu meals, I resorted to some other sneaky ways to make sure that she ate nuts, and here I am sharing these with you. Before that though, please understand that some kids might be allergic to nuts and make sure of that before you introduce nuts to your child. Consult your paediatrician to find out how you can know whether or not your child is allergic to nuts.
  1. Mix almond or peanut butter in rice cereal: This is strictly for children over a year old, and who aren’t allergic to nuts. You can mix a little spoon of almond butter or peanut butter in your child’s rice cereal or even oats porridge that you make for her. Mix while the porridge or cereal is still warm so that the butter melts and mixes in well.
  2. Spread almond/ peanut/cashew butter on a toast: For children who are older and like to eat bread (like most children) you can skip the regular processed butter and use some peanut, almond or cashew butter instead. Don’t use the chunky kind. It is better if you use homemade almond, peanut or cashew butter as opposed to store-bought ones.
  3. Almond meal in cupcakes: Almonds are said to boost memory, and they are a good source of omega3 fatty acids. If your child refuses to eat the almonds that you soak overnight for her, you can make her favourite cupcakes with almond meal instead. Almond meal cupcakes are easy and quick, and definitely very tasty.
  4. Almond meal in pancakes: While almond meal cupcakes are a healthy snack option, if you want something for everyday meals, then make almond meal pancakes for your toddler’s breakfast. Serve it with a drizzle of honey or with her favourite fruits.
  5. Add low sodium pesto to baby’s khichdi: Most children like to eat khichdi for their lunch. Khichdi has a beautiful, smooth texture that most children like, and you can add as many vegetables as you like, without your child noticing. To make it even tastier, add some low-sodium and no chilli pesto, make of pine nuts and olive oil to your baby’s khichdi.
Image: Shutterstock
Source: http://www.thehealthsite.com/fitness/sneaky-ways-to-add-nuts-in-your-childs-diet-z0617/

Ghana: Gomoa West DCE urges farmers to plant coconut, cashew crops

17 July 2017



Apam (C\R), July 17, GNA - Mr Bismark Baisie Nkum, the District Chief Executive of Gomoa West, says coconut and cashew nut cultivation could earn more money and called on farmers to invest in that area.
He said bee-keeping also helped to generate a lot of money adding that government was making efforts to support bee-keepers to reduce poverty among rural dwellers.
Mr Nkum was addressing about 40 senior citizens who had made significant contributions to the state in diverse ways at Apam.
He said the two crops; coconut and cashew nut, at the moment brought more money than cocoa due to their high demand on the world market.
Mr Nkum appealed to the chiefs to be magnanimous to liaise with land owners and release lands for developmental projects in the area.
He said the acquisition of land had been a problem due to the numerous litigations in the District.
The DCE announced that the proposed mini harbour project at Mumford would commence before the end of the year.
He said the successful completion of the project would offer jobs to the teeming fishermen who had migrated to do fishing in the Western Region.
Nana Oteiba, the Queenmother of Gomoa Ankamu, reiterated the need for parents to take good care of their children to reduce teenage pregnancy.
Mr Samuel Annan, an Agriculturist at Gomoa Mfantseman, called on the Government to provide fertilizers to farmers in the remote areas to promote the ‘Planting for Food and Jobs.’  
Mr Anthony Cole, an opinion leader, expressed regret that politicians often chased them for votes only to abandon them after winning elections.
GNA
Source: http://www.ghananewsagency.org/economics/gomoa-west-dce-urges-farmers-to-plant-coconut-cashew-crops-119672